Archive for November, 2017

Ten Top Toys Not to Get Children Affected with Autism for the Holidays

Thursday, November 23rd, 2017

Maybe this list applies to all modern kids. Especially as regards offspring who are ‘on the spectrum’, our experience and perspective from The Child Development Center can assist gift givers with decisions about whether holiday offerings are consistent with recovering challenged children, as well as making them happy.

What Not To Get Junior for the Holidays

1. Toys that talk to your kid. It’s supposed to be the other way ’round. Imagination through a favorite dolly or stuffed animal, and self talking, represent practice in communication. If someone has to invent a robot that speaks, it should also prompt. Can you imagine that conversation?

2. Stuff that fosters repetitious behaviors. Scrubbing Angry Birds on a digital screen preys upon the fabric of the youngster’s repetitive behaviors. Similarly, devices that enable constant You-Tube video re-viewing foment restricted interests.

3. Most digital gadgets, unfortunately engender those problematic criteria previously listed (#1, #2). i-Things should be reserved for when the parents absolutely cannot attend to the child, rather than becoming a body appendage. And, whenever possible, use a timer to notify the child, “No more.”

4. Presents that are primarily intended for indoor use. There’s already plenty of entertainment throughout the house, and miniaturized for portable use. Encourage healthy outdoor play. That means added work for families of special needs children; but scooters, trampolines, swings and parks – even if your child just watches – are worth a great deal more than another box of Legos.

5. Too many items. While it’s important to promote variety, as witnessed through the oft-uploaded FaceBook album depicting an orgy of holiday presents, that superabundance cannot promote anything but indifference to a truly valued item. As many parents know, just getting a child who is affected with ASD to appreciate any toy is a victory.

6. It’s difficult to completely eliminate preferred playthings. We show our love by gifting pleasurable items. But, those who thoughtfully provide a child’s favorite Disney movie or Star Wars model (when they already have 4 that are similar) might find their special item tucked away for another occasion.

7. Pets that you, the parent, don’t want to take care of. Because, no matter what any other family member claims, the purchaser of the animal is the de facto feeder, caretaker and parent of yet, another ward.

8. Any toy that emits an annoying noise. Frankly, if it makes any noise, the buyer should listen to it, like, 75 times, to experience the real gift. And, ‘friends’ who insist on giving your child such an annoying offering, aren’t really your friends.

9. Even objects that you don’t think can become weaponized may turn into dangerous flying objects. But, those that start out that way are suspect. Sure, that lightsaber looks appealing and fun. But will little princess Leah be bonking brother Jimmy on the head with it?

10. Gadgets with an easily accessible battery compartment. Even when the power is kept in a secure section, Junior may figure it out, especially if reinsertion into a body part is their mission. But, as you are traveling to the ER, you will know that, at least you tried to protect the child.

Conclusion
The message is, think twice before plunking down your precious dollars that could be otherwise spent on valuable therapies, which are necessary to promote healthier development. As with neurotypical kids, the box may be as entertaining (and better play) as the toy inside.

Consider the child’s state of autism. Not unlike many other areas of a special needs child’s life, it’s not fair, but even purchasing gifts requires extra evaluation.

Is Big Pharma Knocking Off Functional Medicine Doctors?

Saturday, November 18th, 2017

I awoke one morning recently, to this shocking Facebook post: 77th Holistic Doctor Shot Dead In Her AZ Home With Her Entire Family.

Considering the violent circumstances surrounding this daunting list of clinicians’ deaths, including Drs. Jeffrey Bradstreet, John HicksRose Polge, etc., I wondered, “Are they coming after me, as well?”

Why I’m really not worried
A small, boutique practice, such as The Child Development Center, should hardly appear on any corporate radar screen. We have taken care of thousands of patients, while pharmaceutical companies can reach multiple millions utilizing propaganda and government access.

Planetary drug stores continue to fund and create new potentially harmful products. This grouping of functional physicians may just represent collateral damage.

Large drug companies possess the power to spread cancer in our collective being, death is but one eventuality. Considering Pharma’s great scientific strides, and enormous profits, someone ought to slip a ‘Fund for Diabetes Prevention Program’ message into the corporate suggestion box (paid for with some of the dough that insulin generates), rather than knock off a few holistic practitioners.

Any conspiracy talk is best minimized because the conversation usually devolves into a controversy regarding the childhood vaccination schedule. The Wakefield effect. More heat, less light.

The story, presented in a somewhat sensational manner, has appeared in more alt-thinking venues, such as ascensionwithearth.com, thescienceofeating.com, and healthnutnews.com. So, the message may simply be ‘preaching to the choir’, or considered ‘kooky’ and overly dramatic.

The local news station reported, “Police: AZ father kills wife, toddler, baby, himself in weekend murder-suicide…
Investigators believe the cause was financial issues. A co-worker… called police Friday after finding all four shot to death in a room.

Conclusion
I sincerely hope that these deaths are not part of some conspiracy. If it’s true, multinational drug companies are only shooting themselves in the foot, getting negative publicity that isn’t worth the effort. Pharmaceutical manufacturers are already entrapping us in a variety of ways.

So, I’m not getting a gun, or hiring a bodyguard. We’ve all got more substantial stuff to worry about, like getting kids with speech apraxia to talk.

The Perils of Home Treatment for Autism

Sunday, November 5th, 2017

Were it not for a lack of knowledge or, frankly, interest on the part of most of the medical community, parents of children with autism would be happy to relinquish their quest for appropriate treatment.

Too often, I listen to stories about pediatricians who have declared, “Well, I don’t know much about that ‘spectrum’ diagnosis. Let’s wait 3 to 6 months and see what develops.” Or neurologists who, after observing a patient for less than 5 minutes arrive at what they think is an accurate diagnosis, followed by little in the way of explanation, and even less effort to provide relief, other that a ticket to, “find a good therapist.” Then, there is the peanut gallery of mildly interested observers who implicate over-diagnosis and link the epidemic to anti-vaccination conspiracies.

That being said, the families who are left to fend for themselves in this void must navigate a sea of dangerous waters in order to find safe, reliable and effective protocols for children affected with ASD. These are some of the issues that frequently arise for those warrior-parents.

No matter how ‘benign’ the intervention, what works for one child might actually make another child worse. There are many different kinds of autism, including boys (aggressive) vs. girls, early vs. late (language regression), immune (rashes, constantly sick and antibiotics), gastrointestinal (reflux, bowel problems), and genetic variations. Furthermore, at any one point in time, speech apraxia, social isolation, sensory issues, or aggression might define a child’s autism. So, Dr. Google’s therapy du jour may not even apply to the present status of your offspring.

Will Junior actually take a supplement that was suggested on the Internet? Compliance issues are a major challenge among our patients at The Child Development Center. Children are usually very picky eaters, sometimes refusing to chew, or preferring to smell everything, and not likely to ingest another yucky concoction. The ‘best’ fish oil won’t work if your child won’t take it, so a better tasting, less expensive, well-tolerated version may be the better choice.

Costs can spiral out of control. Each affected child may take between 5 to 10 supplements/medications per day, often exceeding $300 per month. And, of course, it is not covered by health insurance. Can you really afford to give another remedy on the advice of a friend-of-a-friend-of-a-person-whose-kid-has-autism?

Complicated, expensive therapies are compelling. Parents who seek experimental, untested, and/or potentially dangerous regimens are not foolish or ignorant, they are frustrated and desperate. For the most part, unless your family has unlimited resources, your money is better spent on proven, conventional behavioral interventions.

Parents may not be aware whether item #2 on the list of supplements is actually amplifying item # 7, or nullifying. For example, notwithstanding manufacturers’ claims, digestive enzymes digest stuff. Probiotics, proteins, etc. work best when they reach their intended destination in the natural state, so some products must be given individually.

Home therapies do not take the place of a thorough medical workup by an experienced practitioner who demonstrates reproducible results. Vitamin D, e.g., is great, but high doses could be harmful. The child’s blood count, liver, kidneys, thyroid, and other metabolic functioning should be documented and followed when a fragile toddler is the recipient of pharmaceuticals of any kind, with potentially serious effects.

Conclusion
Rather than eschewing novel treatments, I am eager to become educated about patients’ reactions – positive and negative – so that my advice applies to each individual child, at a particular point in their recovery, targeted at the therapies that will take the patient to the next level toward independent function.

I have learned useful techniques from naturopathic, holistic, Ayurvedic, and just plain Mom-medicine. Epsom salt baths, attention to nutrition, probiotics, essential oils, and the like, can be quite helpful. However if you are experiencing a 2 year-old who is not making eye contact, a 3 year-old who doesn’t speak, or a 4 year-old who is banging her head, sooner or later you will get the most tangible results from a practitioner who can accurately identify, and treat, such serious challenges.

About regimens and treatments that some might say, “How can it hurt?” the most important lost resource may be time.

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Brian D. Udell MD
6974 Griffin Road
Davie
FL 33314
Office phone – 954-873-8413
Fax – 954-792-2424

Email bdumd@childdev.org
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