A Vaccination Booster?

Regarding any association between ‘shots’ and the occurrence of ASD, the vast majority of accepted scientific evidence supports vaccine safety. Yet, for a great number of families, the term ‘vaccine safety’ is an oxymoron.

When childhood inoculation schedules light up the social media radar screen, there is often an increasing demand for my professional assessment.

"My child has made alot of progress.
 I have learned to pick my battles. So we have won some battles...
 What is your opinion on the current Vaccine CDC Controversy?...
 I feel soooo let down by my government!
 I need to hear from a Professional that is honest and caring...
 What would Dr. Udell Do? (Please say hello to Karen)"

The issue:
A now unavailable, already discredited, (formerly) published ‘study’ in the journal Translational Neurodegeneration, made claims about an increased risk of autism after MMR vaccinations in African-American males. Assertions surfaced about the validity of data collection and evaluation, implicating a government cover-up. That fueled online finger pointing.

The press loves a fight, especially when it involves those anti-vaccination kooks.

The light:
Well, there really was no light. The 10-year-old study in question was appropriately explained. Given design and outcome measures, the conclusions in that paper seem valid. As long as Dr. Thompson, the whistleblower, remains at lawyers’ length from public questioning, little ground is gained by explanations from anti-vaccination spokesperson, Dr. Brian Hooker.

Solid evidence is lacking about whether autism may be triggered by certain vaccinations, various dosages, schedules, in susceptible individuals, in the presence of certain physical findings, and depending on previous medical or family history, sex, age, etc. Then, there are external difficulties, such as the quality of storage and labeling, which have been brought into question.

NEVER? Impossible?
The government notes that ‘shots’ are responsible for fevers (up to 25%), seizures and neurologic disruption.
But not autism.

The heat:
CNN dredged up The Wakefield Effect; stories concerning any non-conventional point-of-view regarding autism should be assumed as false, and they could be dangerous.

Talking heads derided “those zealots” who are despoiling herd immunity with ignorant, self-centered beliefs. Still, in a highlighted measles vignette, the group-in-question was Amish! Such issues are extant in other religious organizations, as well. Autism outcome is not their primary concern, and that isn’t going to change with any CDC proclamation.

Admonishment from detached media ‘pundits’ further marginalizes affected families who are so baffled by what happened to their perfectly developing infant or toddler.

Conclusion:
We don’t even know what autism is, what causes it, or what has led to the increasing number of patients. Yet, the powers-that-be seem so sure about what doesn’t cause the problem. And often, about what doesn’t help, either.

Nothing has changed. I cannot get my head around the disconnect between public and medical opinion.
Two people get the ebola virus and we’re all running for the hills.
Autism as an epidemic? Not sure about that one.

This story is a tempest-in-a-teapot based on a decades-old study when the incidence of autism was 1/110. The rate has nearly doubled since that time. Rather than deriding those who question the gods of medical science, it’s time to delve even deeper into the factor(s) producing this modern epidemic.

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