Autism Conference Spring 2015

The Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs provides this semiannual standard-of-care meeting, which is dedicated to teaching physicians and other practitioners who care for patients with ASD.

Various educational courses were offered, covering a variety of interests and experience. This being the 7th conference, an entire day was reserved for difficult clinical cases, discussed among ~30 doctors, who had previously passed the basic science courses.

Mitochondrial functioning played a significant role in this year’s presentations. The myriad of functions involved with these cellular power-plants was explored. This is a complicated topic that includes genetics (mitochondria even have their own chromosomes), over- under- and malfunctioning, environmental effects, cell-to-cell, cell-to-system and cell-to-environment interactions.

Impressions:
Prior to one of the lectures, there was a wonderful moment when Dr. Bob Sears, Dr. Jerry Kartzinel, Dr. James Neubrander, and Dr. Dan Rossignol were among those discussing the recent measles epidemic and what their practice was doing to address the situation. That conversation would have made a well-hit youtube video!

Another time I found myself eating lunch with Dr. Michael Elice, Dr. Stuart Freedenfeld, and other popular autism practitioners. There was a great sense of camaraderie and common purpose. This is one the few social experiences when doctors, such as myself, are not derided for our unpopular opinions.

Any new treatments?
Dr. Sid Baker, a true pioneer in the practice of the biomedical treatment for ASD, presented a wonderful historical perspective. Because of an earlier focus on autism as a genetic disorder, Dr. Baker opined that, “The last ten years have shown very little progress in the way of understanding and treatment of autism.”

One frequently discussed off-topic topic was the lack of research and safety of chlorine dioxide (ClO2), which is touted on the web as a helpful treatment. It is supposed to work by ridding the body of parasites. Ironically, however, one of the more popular new treatments involves helminth therapy (giving parasites to patients) to re-invigorate the immune system.

Conclusion:
It would be preferable if participants could return from such an educational experience with a list of novel therapies for our most challenging patients.

For now, learning key tricks and tips that address negative behaviors, or gut health, for example, are the order of the day. We learned about more precise lab tests, key findings that could point to more specific therapies, and important metabolic pathways that will help our patients, if not today, soon.

We consider what avenues to pursue, and those that need further evaluation. This organization is dedicated to providing well-researched medical solutions.

Because autism is so widespread, misunderstood, variable and mysterious, the ability to network with international experts and ‘pick the brain’ of those in the trenches is the most valuable feature that the conference provides.

“It’s supposed to be hard. If it were easy, everyone would do it”
Tom Hanks in A League of Their Own

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