Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs 2016 Spring Conference

Practitioners, such as myself, find that it is necessary to attend the bi-annual Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs conference for two important reasons. First, to listen to experts from all over the world present their knowledge and latest research. Second, to network with, and learn from, other like-minded practitioners.

What I Liked Best
This year, I chose the ADHD path. The workups that were presented tended to be somewhat complex, and perhaps unattainable for many patients. The bottom line was to get a medical evaluation. The differential diagnosis ranges from thyroid to PANDAS. Mostly all agreed that stimulant and psychotropic meds should not be the first line in treatment. One professor spent some time questioning the diagnosis, itself, and how the modern world has contributed to the epidemic.

What I Liked Least
Traveling all the way to Costa Mesa, CA. Course work is 8 hours per day, so no time for Disneyland, etc.

This Year’s Major Focus
Mitochondrial function continued to play a big role in the presentations. The advanced courses involved lots of methylation, detoxification, and energy production diagrams. The newest twist has been the addition of genetic testing to better determine the cause(s) of inadequately functioning biologic pathways. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and ‘epigenetics’ were the buzzwords – how individual genes interact with the environment and within the individual leading to dysfunction and downstream signs and symptoms.

Topics That Were Discussed in Passing
Microarray genetic testing, covering multiple genes, did not play a big part in this year’s talks. Discussions about childhood immunizations underlie a great deal of the members’ conversations; specifically the lack of solid scientific evidence for safety in high risk populations. Attendees are not against vaccinations, by the way. Lyme disease was discussed in general, and as that inflammatory process relates to other infectious-metabolic conditions.

Subjects Not Formally Presented
GcMAF and nagalase levels. Some patients have indicated that a useful, safe supply may become available, so that will help determine future use. As well, chlorine dioxide, hyperbaric oxygen treatment, helminths, medical marijuana, and stem cell therapy were not offered by this year’s presenters.

Conclusion
It is disappointing to return from such conferences without that ‘magic bullet’. Just standing around, listening to Sid Baker speak about how he got interested in autism, or asking him how the ‘ion cleaning’ footpath worked, is worth the price of admission, however. This science started with Dr. Baker, and he continues to be an inquisitive, gentle force for hope, 40 years later.

In the absence of a sufficient population of scientists who are willing and available to address this modern epidemic of childhood developmental problems, this meeting stands as a bastion against the current state of ignorance.

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