Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs Spring 2017 Conference

At the conference with Yale prof Dr. Sid Baker – one of the originators of biomedical treatment

If practitioners wish to become more effective in the diagnosis and treatment of children who suffer developmental challenges, it will require a new paradigm. Therefore, attending conferences, such as the Simons Foundation for Autism Research, the Autism Research Institute, and the Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs, is essential to acquiring that knowledge.

This year’s advanced sessions introduced a completely new functional medicine topic – Hormones from Pregnancy to Teens. Dr. Cindy Schneider examined the differences between the brain anatomy, physiology, and chemistry that might explain how ASD affects males vs. females, and the consequences as we age. Additionally, there are the special complications incurred throughout puberty, with important implications regarding effective treatments.

Dr. Stephen Genuis‘ presentations, Hormone Disrupting Agents, provided a fascinating complement to that lecture. He highlighted the chronic nature of ASD, and the disrupting effects of toxic agents in our modern environment. A key component is the toxic load; if topical agents represent ounces, ingested compounds represent pounds, and the air that we breathe can be expressed in tons of potential poisonous compounds. And, it takes months or years to eliminate what takes days or weeks to ingest. He also pointed out that medical school curricula and training in toxicology is woefully inadequate.

Dr. Lynne Mielke rounded out the day by submitting actual case histories of young people with mysterious medical problems. Her background includes personal experience, extensive knowledge and patient care. This physician’s psychiatric/neurological point-of-view was especially insightful and provided valuable material that directly applied to the audience’s practice population.

Day 2
Another novel and exciting topic was Preconception Care: A New Standard of Care in Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Dr. Genuis discussed the increased risks of preterm birth, Caesarian section delivery, and chronic childhood illness, such as cancers, diabetes, autoimmune conditions, autism and  ADHD.
He presented the emerging research of toxicant exposures and nutritional deficiencies that continue to escalate. Metabolic disruptions may easily ensue, leading to many of the persistent disorders that are now experienced by an increasing number of children, although they may look perfectly normal at birth.

Such difficulties seem imminently preventable in the population, and there appears to be a lack of awareness in the majority of obstetricians. Even fathers who are exposed to toxic agents may become a vector for such later difficulties. Dr. Genuis then discussed the means to eliminate the myriad of  toxins – mostly by sweating, but some by other means, such as fasting or medication.

Dr. Elizabeth Mumper followed with an in-depth discussion about the lack of awareness of proper nutrition, environmental factors, the hazards of indiscriminate use of antibiotics, and poorly researched vaccinations, which appear to be significant factors leading to autism. She even offered another alternative schedule for high-risk infants and toddlers.

Nutritionist Robert Miller presented a very dense lecture, attempting to answer the complicated question, “What can be done about all of those new-fangled genetics tests?” Suffice it to say, that offering will take some time to digest.

Day 3
The lectures consisted of an assortment of the faculty’s most difficult cases. Experts included Drs. Baker, Frye, and Neuenschwander; and the audience wasn’t too shabby, either. Case histories were offered about families who experience unimaginable, incomprehensible challenges; from self-mutilation, to children attempting suicide (sometimes, successfully), to attacks on their caregivers.

The take-home items from such discussions are simply, “How can we prevent this, and successfully treat our population?”

Conclusion
It’s fortuitous that Dr. Ratajczek’s article, which examined the research about vaccine safety, was published at the time of this seminar. Participants have been wringing our hands about the ‘disconnect’ between what we (and many parents) experience every day, and conventional medicine’s dogma. The article might act as fuel-to-the-fire for some, be ignored by the majority, but represents some slight measure of vindication for our hard-working tribe.

We are getting only marginally closer to our understanding about the cause(s), treatment(s), and prevention(s) for autism. Much more research is needed. The Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs provides a valuable platform for presenting, evaluating, and disseminating such expertise.

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