Posts Tagged ‘autism puzzle’

Autism, Inoculations, and Fantasyland

Sunday, January 25th, 2015

Recent news about the increase in measles that has sprung up in California, has brought about the usual media finger-pointing, claiming that the cause is unvaccinated children whose parents unnecessarily worry about the risk of autism.

As documented in my previous posts on this topic, this physician believes in the value of those twentieth century miracles. Nonetheless, a lingering question remains, “Are all of the vaccinations safe and effective for all young children?”

The Three Main Reasons for the Measles ‘Outbreak’

Lack of Knowledge

We really don’t know the reason(s) for the newest episode. The increase may have little to do with lack of compliance by anti-vaccination zealots. Many of the infected individuals were Disney workers who had probably already been vaccinated, and were no longer immune. Plus, the venue is an international attraction, with visitors from all over.

The Wakefield Effect – Any time there is any story involving vaccines and ASD, the controversial and now-infamous British study that implicated measles virus as a possible cause, seems to mar all perception and reason. Media pundits are quick to avail themselves of that ill-fated research.

Conventional medicine is still debating whether increases are merely due to changes in diagnostic criteria. Every week a new association pops up; including maternal weight, paternal age, environment and toxins, stress, and circumcision. If compliance is the issue, certainly such confusion shakes one’s faith in the ‘science’.

Polarization

The experts would have a great deal more validity and success, if they could add more understanding and kindness to their approach. Those who question the status quo are considered kooky, ignorant and ill-informed. That creates more polarization, with fewer parents possibly choosing to vaccinate.

Pro-vaccination declarations are rarely equivocal, and conclusions no longer contain the statement, “The topic deserves further study.” Anti-vaccination supporters suffer a similar shortcoming, and conspiracy theories are a scientific distraction. There doesn’t seem to be any compromise position.

Issues, such as the recent CDC whistle-blower case, or reports of safety violations have not been adequately addressed.

There still aren’t any definitive, prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind crossover studies with long-term outcomes evaluating various vaccine schedules to document safety. Holistic medicine is frequently chastised by the establishment for such an omission in alternative protocols.

Lack of Confidence & Trust

A great deal of money is handed to drug manufacturers to manage these vaccination programs. Concerns abound about whether large multi-national companies always have our best interests in mind.

The Flu vaccine fiascos that permeate each winter do not engender a great deal of confidence about how our medical establishment handles the inoculation issue.

The government continues to send out inaccurate and conflicting messages regarding our public health. Antibiotics in our food are proven unsafe, but the practice continues. There were 2 cases of ebola and Congress appointed a ‘czar’, but they couldn’t confirm a Surgeon General.

Public trust in the FDA and CDC has been eroded by frequent lapses in judgement and execution.

Conclusion:
The vast majority of the scientific literature is quite insistent that there is no relationship between the present vaccine schedule and ASD. To all of the experts, ‘true’ scientists, and colleagues – I get it!

That fact remains that there are too many parents who have noted developmental regression proximate to a childhood vaccination. They deserve better answers.

Autism, ADHD and Circumcision

Sunday, January 18th, 2015

New information has been forthcoming from a Danish database lately, specifically involving autism. This study represents data involving more than 1/3 million children, entered from 1994 to 2003 .

As might be expected, an eye-catching array of media headlines followed the paper entitled, “Ritual circumcision and risk of autism spectrum disorder in 0- to 9-year-old boys: national cohort study in Denmark”.

The Results:
All of the circumcised boys had an increased relationship to ASD. Some adjustments (birthweight, APGAR score, etc.) were accounted for, while other known, possible associations were not (pain relief, living near pollution, diet, e.g.).

Additionally, circumcised boys in non-Muslim families were also more likely to have an ADHD diagnosis.

Other Research:
A 2013 study looked at the increasing incidence of ASD since acetaminophen (Tylenol) has been routinely used for pain relief during circumcision. The authors suggested “… the need for formal study of the role of paracetamol in autism.” In other words, they looked at the problem from the other direction; and when pain relief was provided, autism increased.

Discussion:
The Danish investigation contains a most glaring conclusion that makes the data-in-question eminently quotable, “We confirmed our hypothesis that boys who undergo ritual circumcision may run a greater risk of developing ASD.” I wrote to ask the principle author, Dr. Morten Frisch, about this.

The doctor took the time to respond to a number of questions about the information. He seemed to be somewhat sensitive that such controversy has surrounded these (admittedly) two highly emotional topics, and he is taking plenty of outside criticism. Furthermore, Dr. Frisch has assumed an “I’m-just-the-messenger” attitude about the conclusion.

For me, a major sticking point is a design anomaly which brings the entire report into question. Specifically, children who hadn’t been circumcised but were autistic were considered as not autistic until they got the operation, for the purposes of the data analysis.

For example, a seven-year-old who already had autism didn’t get classified that way, until he was circumcised at 7, (which is clinically impossible).
My question, “If a study shows that I am an architect, not a doctor, isn’t the study flawed?”
Dr. Frisch’s response, “No, in your example the methods would not be ’flawed’, but ‘imprecise’.” Either word – it’s inaccurate. The product only represents a mathematical reality.

Conclusion:
Male circumcision and autism are both very controversial issues. Supporters for various points-of-view will use self-selected segment(s) of the data to fit their particular pro or con argument.

The practice of male foreskin removal is decided according to family, friends, folklore, culture, customs, and cosmetics. The present medical evidence is far from conclusive.

Regarding the cause and prevention of autism, the more significant medical information is that vigorous scrutiny and intervention in a young infant’s nutritional and developmental status is the most successful means to fend off possible delays.

As for the present study? “There are lies, damn lies, and statistics.” (Mark Twain)

What Causes Autism – 2014

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014

A question and an answer. This is number two on the list of most-asked questions of this pediatrician. Number one = “Is there really more autism?” Number 3 = “It isn’t connected to the vaccinations, right?”

Here is this year’s evidence implicating our polluted environment:

Pesticides – One expert said, “Until about five years ago, virtually all research on autism assumed that the disease was entirely genetic in origin, and that environmental exposures did not play a role… Rising rates of autism and failure to find genetic causes despite a multitude of very large genetic studies have led to a major shift in focus in the field. … These chemicals are a solid lead that needs to be followed.”

In June, Scientific American published an article entitled, Autism Risk Higher Near Pesticide-Treated Fields.

Glyphosates (Roundup, by Monsanto) – Not only could the ubiquitous use of this toxin, used to increase the yield of harvested wheat, contribute to a dangerous load for susceptible fetuses, newborns and toddlers, it could explain the reason that so many feel improvement from a “gluten-free” diet.

Genetically Modified Foodstuffs received a stamp of approval, on the other hand, from the Genetic Literacy Project.

Environmental Factors, in general, have shown a relationship to autism in a recent research.

Electromagnetic Fields and Radio Frequency Radiation  – Based on the recent information provided by the remarkable Dr. Martha Herbert, these international authors felt compelled to write to the Pediatric Journal of Neurosciences, “An epidemiological study is warranted in order to explore the possible link between the prevalence of autism and the extent of electromagnetic pollution.”

The overuse and injudicious use of antibiotics continues to raise concern. Gastrointestinal health is being actively studied as a key cause of autistic signs and symptoms.

Exposure to steroids continues to make its way into the literature. Our offspring did not recently mutate, and there are a myriad of reasons why there has been increased pre- and post- natal exposure.

Prenatal exposure to anti-seizure medication was reported as a cause of autism.

Childhood Vaccinations – The controversy regarding the pros (they DO) and cons (they DON’T) rages. The most compelling answer would be provided by a prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind, cross-over study. Who wants to put their child in the control group?

Heavy metals were reported as an environmental toxin associated with ASD in Dr. Rossignol’s thorough literature review.

This epidemic is due to the perfect storm of susceptible individuals in a poisoned environment. Now, if we could just figure out who carries the highest susceptibility and which agents are the most toxic.

When Professionals Disagree about Autism

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

Parents strive to do their best for all their children, and this is especially challenging for those with special needs. So, families seek assistance from assorted channels; including books, other parents, therapists, teachers, professional practitioners, and of course, the Internet.

Inevitably, discussions arise about the ‘best way’ to handle specific situations, including the core domain difficulties of social isolation, repetitive motions (‘stims’) and communication.

Due to the enigmatic combination of signs and symptoms that presently fall under an Autism Spectrum diagnosis, there are usually more opinions than the number of authorities involved.

Conflicting information emanates from various sources:
Often, child neurologists are negative about practitioners who offer alternative medical interventions. There has been little change in the advice that they have offered for the past 25 years. Their information is based upon children who were previously put into mental institutions with other ‘retarded’ individuals.
What is the parent of a 5-year-old with apraxia to do? “Get more therapy!” Really? That’s all you’ve got, doc?

Likewise, pediatricians are generally clueless regarding ASD. Whenever a professional concludes, “We should wait for 6 months or so, to give a diagnosis,” parents should seek more substantial advice. What other medical condition is assigned this situation? Certainly not ear, throat or sinus problems, which appear to require immediate antibiotic intervention, regardless of a fever or other confirmatory signs.

Specialists, such as gastroenterologists, allergists, immunologists, pulmonologists and dermatologists seem to have tunnel vision, when it comes to autism. ‘Constipation’ and ‘eczema’ are descriptive terms, not astute diagnoses. Steroids are short-lived band-aids. Miralax® and Prilosec® are downright dangerous.

Psychiatrists, developmental pediatricians, and psychologists are considered experts in assigning an accurate diagnosis. However, RisperdalAbilify, and Adderall never made any child speak. Plus, there are a multitude of negative side effects.

Speech and Language Therapists are the authorities who have been on the front line of the autism epidemic. Children who do not speak are apraxic – period! Advice, such as, “He doesn’t want to speak,” is meaningless. “Mommy, I want juice,” is easier than dragging a parent to the refrigerator. The child would say it, if the circuits worked correctly.

Occupational and physical therapists should be a mainstay, until fine motor skills become age-appropriate. If there were a supplement or medication for such abilities, we would all take a pill and get piano lessons. In the meantime, it takes practice, practice, practice. Children who avoid handwriting lessons are not ‘easily distracted'; they simply don’t wish to ‘suck’ in another activity that other kids tolerate or even enjoy.

Behavioral therapists who claim that a young child is too disruptive and requires medication should seek other employment. Similarly, assigning blame to the family for inconsistent or incorrect responses is not helpful. The more challenging the behavior, the more that a professional should seek the cause and treatments.

The Internet is a collection of stories, with little supporting information. Parents should seek sites that use hyperlinks to actual studies and avoid those with quick fixes or magic remedies. If it worked, we would know about it.

Other families are helpful, for sure. However, their experience is limited to the number of children, their ages, and their condition. No matter how well-meaning, the information needs to be taken with a great deal of salt.

The solution to all of these various expert opinions, is aided by an experienced medical practitioner who has cared for many patients and listens. By taking into account the history, physical, laboratory findings, and previous treatment regimes, a framework for real progress can be constructed.

How Many Doctors Does It Take to Screw in a Light Bulb?

Sunday, December 14th, 2014

As seasonal changes come into full swing, too many moms are visiting too many physicians, and getting too few answers.

Children with immunologic difficulties who suffer conditions such as asthma, severe food sensitivities, eczema,or frequent infections are more likely to exhibit an increase in signs and symptoms under periods of increased metabolic stress.

The patient’s underlying situation may become more chronic or recurring. Or, there could be subsequent problems; the consequences of energy depletion and additional inflammation. So, parents wishing to hasten improvement, seek professional assistance.

Here’s where it gets tricky.
While traveling through an allergist’s territory, for example, the topic of recurrent or persistent ‘attacks’ may arise. The ‘allergy shots’ probably haven’t changed anything. Antibiotics are prescribed.

The doctor suggests that, perhaps an immunologist could figure it out.

Enter the doctor merry-go-round.
When another consultant is suggested (or, sometimes requested), there should be a realistic expectation about effects and side effects.

In this case, the typical response is a battery of tests that reflect immune functioning, according to that doctor. Results only represent the patient’s state of ill-health. A proper evaluation requires comparison to the child’s healthy state. Furthermore, by the time the tests become available, the clinical situation has probably already changed.

Often, steroids are added to the medical soup. The child feels a bit better, so returns to school and catches a cootie from another student.

More specialists are added.
Perhaps a different virus, a sinus infection, or an underlying allergic condition appears. Typically, a pulmonologist is the next stop. Another battery of labs and tests. Another confusing data set.

More steroids are added – inhaled, through nebulizers, and breathing treatments. Sustained improvement may not be achieved. Nowadays, the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) is offered as a possibility, perhaps explaining the chronic and recurrent nature of the child’s condition.

A gastro-enterologist is then consulted. More tests add to the confusion. Prilosec or Zantac, potent stomach acid inhibitors, are prescribed. What is the concerned parent to believe?

Back to the Pediatrician.
The child who hasn’t improved by now is given a different, more powerful antibiotic. A discussion takes place about whether a New York specialist can offer better advice. In the meantime, academics and socialization have taken a back seat as families seek solid answers.

The primary doctor appears as confused as the parents about the next step. By this time, the patient is taking multiple, potent biologicals that may interfere with each other, or even make things more serious.

There is a solution.
Modern medical care is under scrutiny for the multitude of consultants, rarely resulting in better health care. There are often medication errors, with anxious and baffled patients who display little improvement – or worsen. The specialty of Pediatrics has been customarily exempt from such criticism, because of fewer medical complications.

As a mother recently exclaimed, “Do you think that I want to spend all of December traveling from one doctor to another? It takes a lot of work!”

One well-trained pediatrician, willing to consult with the specific specialists, who takes the time to understand what all those tests and medications represent for this individual, is the best answer. The professional who has the knowledge to interpret and clarify the picture offers the best opportunity for measurable improvement.

When the medical helm is steered by an effective professional, Mom has a lot more time to enjoy the season.

Ten Ways Pediatric Neurologists Can Help Autistic Patients

Monday, December 8th, 2014

With all due respect to the intelligence of physicians who take specialized training in child neurology, it appears that there is often some disconnect between their knowledge about autism and the approach to the families and patients affected by this modern epidemic.

10•Making the diagnosis and giving some tickets for therapies is not enough. Questions such as, “How did my child get this? How many get better? What other things can we do? Are there any tests? Where can I go for more information?” are sure to follow the diagnostic impression. At least, provide useful answers for those interrogatories.

9•The child neurologist has the opportunity to assess the risk of anesthesia versus the poor yield of an MRI. Likewise, assisting in the consideration of a short-term EEG, when there is no indication of seizure activity. Those technologies are not a diagnostic workup.

8•There is more than one kind of autism. There should be careful exploration about specific difficulties with the skin, gastrointestinal system, or frequent infections.

7•Neurologists are in a position to provide valuable assistance regarding various alternative treatments’ risks and expense. An off-hand dismissal about therapies to address other co-morbid conditions does not enhance that specialist’s stature in the eyes of the parents.

6•It might be helpful to suggest simple, possibly helpful treatments, such as dietary restrictions. What is there to lose? For the physician who is truly concerned about key deficiencies, this would be a good opportunity to check the child’s nutritional status with some blood work.

5•Doctors who continue to repeat, “You are doing a great job,” at each visit, with little documentation of change, are less likely to experience further visits.

4•In addition to the usual Fragile X-boy-test and Rett’s-girl-test, the neurologist can order a ‘chromosomal microarray’. Copy number variation affects up to 15% of ASD patients. Insurance companies pay for this. Although the results may not be valuable today, that knowledge may be quite important as our understanding about autism evolves.

3•A screening laboratory evaluation for anemia, kidney, thyroid, and liver status may yield a great deal of information. Even if the busy doctor cannot act upon abnormalities, they can be conveyed to the pediatrician.

2•Expressions such as, “I’m willing to say developmental delay,” or “We have to wait to give you a diagnosis,” are for the previous century. In young toddlers, communication is in its most formative stage. “Let’s err on the side of caution, and make sure that you get S&L, OT, ABA, right away.”

1•There are studies to show that patients can recover. Knowledge about that research and successful outcomes provides real hope for bewildered parents.

Fish Oil for Autism and ADHD

Sunday, November 16th, 2014

It seems that the less that is scientifically certain about a nutritional supplement, the more Internet pages are devoted to convincing surfers about its value to your health.

On the other hand, certain food additives hang on because they appear to have merit. Fish oil, for example, has been a mainstay. In addition to health benefits for heart disease, depression and dementia, improvements have been documented in behavior, ADHD, communication and cognitive function – many of the core symptoms of ASD.

The Basics: (for our purposes)
The brain is rich in fats. They are membrane-stabilizing, anti-oxidizing, electricity-enhancing, chemical-carrying, and account for most of the weight of our CNS.

A healthy metabolism requires dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). One designation (Omega 3-6-9) describes the organic composition. Another important classification describes the size of the molecule (α lipoid acid-> EPA-> DHA).

There is evidence of differences in the PUFAs of people with ASD. The inference is that function can be normalized with dietary intervention by re-establishing typical levels and ratios.

Dietary sources:
Various mixtures derived from the ocean (cod, salmon, krill) and/or plants (flax, corn, nuts) are available. Claims about better stability, quality, purity, ingredients, absorption and disease-specific value are variously offered.

Particularly as regards a condition as multifactorial and enigmatic as ASD, this situation has resulted in a myriad of possible correct, useless, or even harmful choices.

Side effects:
WebMD lists a variety of adverse reactions, the most pertinent to the ASD population being:
G-I symptoms including burping, discomfort and loose stools
•Bleeding, including nosebleeds
PUFAs affect the immune system
•Heavy metal contamination
•Allergy to the source
•Exaggerating mental disorders
•Lowers blood pressure (many patients take bp lowering meds for sleep and anxiety).

Scientific papers reporting various dosages and formulations have demonstrated cautious safety, even in research that does not support assertions of improvement.

Results:
There is more than one study that refutes any positive effects, particularly in ADHD and ASD. There are few reports of gains in speech and language. Even the evidence offered by a popular vitamin company lacks specific supporting documentation.

Many children with ASD are on restricted diets or they are finicky eaters who could use the extra nutrition, anyway. Furthermore, there is a growing body of anecdotal reports and stories of improvement from various omega products.

There is theoretical and documented evidence that supports the proposition that this relatively safe and inexpensive nutritional supplement improves CNS functioning.

Conclusions:
Since we have limited ability to produce them, PUFAs are a dietary requirement. They are Essential Fatty Acids in various combinations, with confusing nomenclature. That situation often leads to marketing opportunities.

Little is certain regarding how this group of supplements affects patients with ASD. Users mostly rely on producer advertising for information and assurances about the “best” product.

In order to assess whether “it’s working,” caretakers should pay particular attention to gains in the most documented behavioral components, such as ADHD and aggression. Being aware of safe dosing and negative effects is valuable, as well.

Perhaps not producing as noticeable an improvement as other biomedical interventions, a high-quality oil that the child can tolerate (taste, smell), at the label-recommended dose, is a reasonable nutritional supplement for ASD.

The War on Autism

Sunday, November 2nd, 2014

In the 1980’s, President Ronald Reagan declared a ‘War on Drugs‘. The Global War on Terrorism was pronounced after 09/11/01. Early in this century, Bush 2 joined the war on HIV/Aids. This week, Obama named an Ebola Czar.

For some time now, the U.S. has only had an acting Surgeon General (Rear Admiral Boris Lushniak), because the nominee, Dr. Vivek Murthy, had the temerity to say that, “Guns are a health care issue.”

Is it any wonder that ASD has taken a backseat to other matters in our healthcare system?

More than forty years ago, Surgeon General C. Everett Koop challenged the tobacco industry juggernaut that assaulted the population of 20th century earth. He raised numerous warnings (including the dangers of second-hand smoke), and even changed the paradigms for advertising and labeling the product. In spite of some unpopular conservative views, especially regarding abortion, Dr. K was still considered America’s Doctor.

What does ‘declaring war’ mean?
It implies urgency. Somehow, more resources appear; including funding, infrastructure, media, etc. Priorities change. For ASD, a medical condition, personnel and materials would become focused on research to elucidate etiology, test treatments and evaluate prevention.

The ‘enemy’ is put on notice that the entire weight of the U.S. government is behind an effort to solve the problem. It worked when we landed a man on the moon, figured out the HIV epidemic, and Bin Laden. Autism is trickier because, like terrorism, it’s difficult to identify the opposition.

A ‘Czar’ is usually named. The Big Kahuna avoids Senate confirmation. Hopes are raised. There would be a commander to unify the disparate autism organizations.

How would the appointment of an Autism Czar help?
There would be instant recognition, finally, that there is an epidemic. Apparently, “ASD now affecting 1/42 males,” does not sound dire enough.

A true understanding of the costs should enlighten the prudent potentate about the enormous savings produced by early diagnosis and effective intervention.

There would be a respected leader to delegate resources to the areas of most need. This individual also has ultimate responsibility for education, caring for older patients, and the most affected.

More medical specialists would get involved in the search for answers. Gastroenterologists, dermatologists, immunologists, child neurologists, and pediatricians would find increased incentives to join the autism battle.

Research leading to effective medications would speed up. The major complaint by drug manufacturers is that it costs >$ 1B to develop any new drug. Perhaps, as in other crusades, the ASD maven could cut through the red tape to get things moving.

Vaccination research would take a new direction. Increased resources should include the formulation of controlled, prospective, randomized, double-blind studies about the various components of the present childhood immunization schedule, dose and timing. This would go a long way to clearing up the many lingering concerns in this area.

Unification would provide a national infrastructure for tackling the situation. The evaluation of genetic, environmental, bacteriological, nutritional, and other important disciplines by the Boss and Joint Chiefs of Autism Medicine may be the best way to gain ground on the enemy.

The Czar would be responsible for making a difference in the autism epidemic.

There is no ‘War on Autism’.
But patients, families and practitioners – those who live and fight in the trenches – could certainly benefit from some reinforcements.

Autism, Broccoli and Cures

Sunday, October 19th, 2014

Sulforaphane treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) made the news this week. According to Johns Hopkins’ researchers, an as-yet unavailable chemical derived from broccoli “…substantially (and reversibly) improved behavior…”

This is great news for parents and professionals who, for decades have been so deprived of clinical studies that are well – designed, performed, documented and published. Many families are now searching for the best way to get sprouts and seeds into their child with ASD.

Importantly, the proposed mechanisms behind the treatment lend mainstream credibility to the concepts of oxidative stress and the work of Jill James, who has published since the beginning of this century. “Sulforaphane, which showed negligible toxicity… upregulates genes that protect aerobic cells against oxidative stress, inflammation, and DNA-damage.”

The Good:
Supplements containing some of the chemical are for sale. There are ~1mg tablets, for example, that sell for ~30¢ each.  Broccoli seeds (the sprouting kind) are available for five bucks, though I’m not quit sure what to do with them.

One virtual vitamin shop advertises sulforaphane as AVMACHOL®, and that website is no longer available. It listed “365 mg of a proprietary substance made of 25mg of glucorapharin (the desired gluconsinolate form), broccoli sprout and mushroom extract.” One per day, @$ 1/per pill. Another lists Sulforaphane (From Broccoli), 0.4mg pill for only 4¢, but they were out of stock at this time.

The Bad:
There appears to be uncertainty regarding the bio-availability of the over-the-counter products. At it’s molecular weight (177 g/mol), and an average 100 uM dose (50-150 reported by researchers), it seems to represent a much larger dose (?~ 18 mg) than a broccoli side dish, or even the aforementioned supplements.

The Ugly:
Two of the authors in the study have explicitly rejected any claim to financial remuneration from sales of the expected product, due to “conflicts of interest.” Righteous! However, the son of one of those docs is the CEO of the new company.

Johns Hopkins University has U.S. patent applications and has licensed “… broccoli sprouts and seeds rich in glucosinolates… to Brassica Protection Products LLC.” That ought to raise the price.

Conclusions:
There are hundreds of patients who have been receiving reduced, (sulfur containing – cysteine boosting) liposomal glutathione for over 6 years, with great results. It turns out that the food with the highest known levels of glutathione – broccoli – works!

Parents who are already administering DMG, TMG, NAC, methyl B12, or reduced glutathione, should be alert for possible increased stimming with this added antioxidant.

At the very least, this information gives new meaning to moms who plead with their child to, “Eat your broccoli!”

Addendum:
Another opinion here

Why Don’t All Doctors Treat Autism This Way?

Sunday, October 12th, 2014

“If this protocol is so great, why doesn’t everyone know about it and do it?”

No answer seems to satisfy those who are firmly grounded in the old-time perceptions about ASD.  A patient’s (physician) family member raised this question recently, and it deserves a proper explanation.

The Top Reasons That Everyone Doesn’t Do It
(Combine a biomedical and traditional approach to reverse autistic signs and symptoms):

Time:
An accurate diagnosis is only produced by a thorough history and physical examination. “It’s autism,” is not good enough. A real medical ‘workup‘ helps determine the type of autism and co-morbidies. That is only the beginning. The most successful outcomes occur when families are involved to assist neuro-typical development.

Today’s physicians simply don’t have the luxury to spend hours per case; unless they are cutting, injecting, or physically assaulting the patient. Time, itself, is undervalued, and few practitioners choose this route.

Money:
Many of the resources that are most effective in reducing the conditions that are diagnosed as ASD are either not- or poorly- covered, by insurance. That applies to professionals, therapies, laboratory testing, supplements, and often even pharmaceutical products. The extra costs for each affected child are in excess of $ 40,000 per year, $ 1.4M per lifetime, and $ 2.4M per lifetime if there is intellectual disability.

Only recently have early diagnosis and intervention produced documented improvement, and biomedical interventions appear to be an unproven and unwarranted cost.

Big pharma is not involved:
Ah, the autism pill. News Flash: Like cancer, there won’t be one kind of ASD, or one successful treatment. However, there is research about many of the conditions that present with similar signs, including genetic and mitochondrial disorders. That work is putting doctors on the right path. As explained at a recent conference, it costs more than $1B to develop a new medication that makes it to patients. To date, 1/68 does not appear to represent an adequate market share.

Plus, many of the successful autism treatments involve supplements that are not expensive or controlled by the drug industry. Doctors are not served a tempting lunch provided by the makers of probiotics or other over-the-counter remedies.

The Wakefield Effect:
Due to controversial statements by a now-infamous British physician, the new reason that, “There are no studies to prove that theory,” is fear on the part of researchers. Really? Then, there are vaccination issues. Furthermore, not unlike previous epidemics, such as HIV-AIDS, there are a multitude of potions, and practitioners who promote them, to fill the medical void.

Parents may be willing travel to abroad or offer unusual treatments, seeking an unproven therapy. They are not crazy, they are desperate. The biomedical treatments that produce results are often lost in such clutter.

Denial:
“Selling” a newly-elucidated medical condition is a problem for family members who don’t think anything is amiss, except their version of proper parenting. Add a dash of medical jargon, and, for some, that is more difficult to swallow than reduced liquid glutathione.

Furthermore, those times when children suffer negative reactions due to die-off or methyl B12 stimulation may be easily misunderstood as regression or worsening of behaviors. Again, such events require a great deal of physician-patient interaction.

Poor Advertising:
The Child Development Center has offered services to many Florida universities, with very slow progress. Perhaps there is resistance due to NIH (Not Invented Here), or the specter of evil as regards the practice of holistic, complementary and alternative medicine. The Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs provides peer-reviewed research and education. TheAutismDoctor.com has a healthy readership, but obviously not enough to change popular opinion.

The gut-brain connection, metabolic problems, toxic exposure, and positive outcomes in ASD have been documented for decades. More publicity nowadays requires a book (working on that one), or a television show.

The Short Answer:
The present state-of-the-art in autism recovery is early recognition, an individualized protocol, and a complicated ongoing process of medical and therapeutic interventions.
It’s not a pill.

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Brian D. Udell MD
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