Posts Tagged ‘diagnosis’

Ten Top Toys Not to Get Children Affected with Autism for the Holidays

Thursday, November 23rd, 2017

Maybe this list applies to all modern kids. Especially as regards offspring who are ‘on the spectrum’, our experience and perspective from The Child Development Center can assist gift givers with decisions about whether holiday offerings are consistent with recovering challenged children, as well as making them happy.

What Not To Get Junior for the Holidays

1. Toys that talk to your kid. It’s supposed to be the other way ’round. Imagination through a favorite dolly or stuffed animal, and self talking, represent practice in communication. If someone has to invent a robot that speaks, it should also prompt. Can you imagine that conversation?

2. Stuff that fosters repetitious behaviors. Scrubbing Angry Birds on a digital screen preys upon the fabric of the youngster’s repetitive behaviors. Similarly, devices that enable constant You-Tube video re-viewing foment restricted interests.

3. Most digital gadgets, unfortunately engender those problematic criteria previously listed (#1, #2). i-Things should be reserved for when the parents absolutely cannot attend to the child, rather than becoming a body appendage. And, whenever possible, use a timer to notify the child, “No more.”

4. Presents that are primarily intended for indoor use. There’s already plenty of entertainment throughout the house, and miniaturized for portable use. Encourage healthy outdoor play. That means added work for families of special needs children; but scooters, trampolines, swings and parks – even if your child just watches – are worth a great deal more than another box of Legos.

5. Too many items. While it’s important to promote variety, as witnessed through the oft-uploaded FaceBook album depicting an orgy of holiday presents, that superabundance cannot promote anything but indifference to a truly valued item. As many parents know, just getting a child who is affected with ASD to appreciate any toy is a victory.

6. It’s difficult to completely eliminate preferred playthings. We show our love by gifting pleasurable items. But, those who thoughtfully provide a child’s favorite Disney movie or Star Wars model (when they already have 4 that are similar) might find their special item tucked away for another occasion.

7. Pets that you, the parent, don’t want to take care of. Because, no matter what any other family member claims, the purchaser of the animal is the de facto feeder, caretaker and parent of yet, another ward.

8. Any toy that emits an annoying noise. Frankly, if it makes any noise, the buyer should listen to it, like, 75 times, to experience the real gift. And, ‘friends’ who insist on giving your child such an annoying offering, aren’t really your friends.

9. Even objects that you don’t think can become weaponized may turn into dangerous flying objects. But, those that start out that way are suspect. Sure, that lightsaber looks appealing and fun. But will little princess Leah be bonking brother Jimmy on the head with it?

10. Gadgets with an easily accessible battery compartment. Even when the power is kept in a secure section, Junior may figure it out, especially if reinsertion into a body part is their mission. But, as you are traveling to the ER, you will know that, at least you tried to protect the child.

Conclusion
The message is, think twice before plunking down your precious dollars that could be otherwise spent on valuable therapies, which are necessary to promote healthier development. As with neurotypical kids, the box may be as entertaining (and better play) as the toy inside.

Consider the child’s state of autism. Not unlike many other areas of a special needs child’s life, it’s not fair, but even purchasing gifts requires extra evaluation.

When Mom and Dad Disagree About Autism Intervention

Sunday, October 15th, 2017

Undoubtedly, the most stressful challenge that any family might face is illness in their child. Even in cases where treatment is established, e.g. acute leukemia, there are bound to be differences of opinion about which doctor, or hospital will do the best job.

When it comes to ASD however, even the diagnosis can remain in doubt. One parent, or a sibling, may have experienced “the same” symptoms, such as late speech or inattentiveness. So, the ‘watchful waiting’ advice from the pediatrician appears most prudent. A neurologist who observed your toddler for 70 seconds may have declared a normal – or dire – outcome. Who to believe? Then, there is the conventional medical community that continues to debate the condition and the ability of earlier recognition to alter the course.

Differences about the diagnosis
 Take an online questionnaire, such as the Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist or Modified Autism Checklist for Toddlers. Although ‘experts’ may deem such surveying as ineffective, it is certainly a start. And, parents shouldn’t bother quibbling over whether Junior should get a “1” or “2” for any single answer. Observing suspicious tendencies may help convince a spouse, or doctor, that there could be real reason for concern.

 Listen to the advice of grandma or grandpa. They have raised other children, even if it was a different century. Try not to listen to advisors who have no responsibility for their opinions.

 If a therapist is already involved, ask what signs and symptoms they view as worrisome. It’s not their labels that you seek, but another professional opinion regarding suspect behavior.

 Don’t be afraid to ask the child’s teacher, or the school personnel, what they think might be different about your child. Academic staff are frequently the first to postulate a problem.

 Take videos of unusual behaviors. One parent may simply not have gotten to spend enough time to have observed a ‘stim’, or recognize activity as repetitive.

 Have the child evaluated by a trained professional. Then, insist on a precise diagnosis. Children with sensory processing, executive functioning disorder, and speech apraxia have autism.

Discrepancies about the next steps
So much inertia must be overcome to establish that first step, simply embracing traditional treatments can offer parents glimpses of improved development. OT (occupational therapy), PT (physical therapy), S&L (speech and language therapy), and ABA (behavioral therapies), must be given the time to reveal results.

At the very least, however, ask your pediatrician to make sure to perform some basic laboratory testing. Even if there is disagreement, how could it hurt to obtain a complete blood count, evaluation of nutritional status (calcium, magnesium, vitamin D, iron), and thyroid screening?

Opposition about biomedical interventions
Although the pull of the Internet is great, children are best served by contacting a physician who is involved in The Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs. Unfortunately, there are too few to adequately staff the burgeoning number of affected children, but, we practice state-of-the-art, evidence-based medical intervention.

By continuing our education within such a medical fellowship, and achieving a thorough knowledge of the science that appears in peer-reviewed journals, doctors have developed protocols that have been proven safe and effective. Although the costs are rarely adequately covered by medical insurance, the investment will last a lifetime. Literally.

Conclusion
Denial and delay are not in your child’s best interests. Doctors who are satisfied with the status quo will achieve that end. Modern thinking is that earlier intervention results in improved outcomes.

At The Child Development Center, our experienced and knowledgeable Practice Manager, Karen, has observed that families who seem to have the most success, “May not be on the same page, but are at least in the same book!”

A Tale of Two Studies – About Autism

Sunday, June 25th, 2017

June 2017
Two quite different papers were published recently, which together directly address important aspects regarding our understanding about diagnosis, prevention and treatment of autism.

The first article is entitled, “Functional neuroimaging of high-risk 6-month-old infants predicts a diagnosis of autism at 24 months of age.” An earlier diagnosis – much earlier – might be on the horizon if this interesting MRI study holds true.

The algorithms are very dense. In fact, I had to ask my neuro-radio-pathologist friend to help me interpret the data, and he said the math gave him a headache! For example, “… a total of 974 functional connections in the 6-month- old brain that showed a relationship with behavior at 24 months and were different between groups. Together, these functional connections constituted <4% of the potential 26,335 total functional connections studied…”

It’s not anatomy, i.e. structure that was evaluated, but the workings of neural pathways, implying that autism (some forms of it, anyway) is present in the brain at a very early age. Autistic behaviors that could be predicted and, possibly successfully prevented or reduced, included social interaction, expressive language, and repetition, among a number of other important parameters.

This evaluation represents a new generation of ‘machine-based learning’, which itself begs further scrutiny. There was a small sample size, and questions remain about the reliably of testing an infant’s thoughts, while inside a moving, noisy environment. The bottom line is, there was high sensitivity and specificity for predicting signs and symptoms at 2 years.

A complementary investigation, published elsewhere, happened to appear this month. It is entitled, “Randomised trial of a parent-mediated intervention for infants at high risk for autism: longitudinal outcomes to age 3 years.” As in the other paper, younger siblings were chosen as subjects, due to their 20 times increased risk of developmental challenges. In similarly aged infants and toddlers, there were improved overall outcomes in the treatment group.

The authors wrote,”… that a very early intervention for at-risk infants has produced a sustained alteration of subsequent child developmental trajectory; reducing prodromal autism symptoms into the second and third years of life to a total of 24 months following end of the intervention.
(Possibly useful data in response to beneficiaries’ requests for insurance coverage?)

Discussion
It is reassuring to observe that, “Earlier diagnosis can lead to appropriate preemptive treatment with improved outcomes,” has become a model of research. Authors of the MRI piece wrote, “Given the known plasticity of the brain and behavior during the first year of life, together with the absence of the defining features of the disorder, intervention during this presymptomatic phase, before consolidation of the full syndrome of ASD, is likely to show considerably stronger benefits compared with later treatments.”

Conclusion
Such analyses ought to shape new treatment paradigms for this exploding epidemic. As similar attitudes become more commonplace, it ought to behoove conventional medicine to look at this evidence-based approach, and start doing more appropriate assessments for patients diagnosed with ASD.

Of course, “further study is required.” In the meantime, information is accumulating that, even a pre-emptive diagnosis seems prudent.

Addendum:
This story appeared in October, 2017 Wall Street Journal:
New Tools Detect Autism Disorders Earlier in Lives

FDA Warning About Autism Treatment

Sunday, April 16th, 2017

The FDA took the time, this week (4/2017), to sound an alarm about their notion of potentially dangerous off-label ASD treatments, by issuing, “Autism: Beware of Potentially Dangerous Therapies and Products“.

The consumer update begins, “One thing that is important to know about autism up front: There is no cure for autism. So, products or treatments claiming to “cure” autism do not work as claimed. The same is true of many products claiming to “treat” autism or autism-related symptoms. Some may carry significant health risks.” Really?

What are the approved therapies?
According to the document, the antipsychotic drugs Risperdal (risperidone) and Abilify (aripiprazole) are apparently not considered to be that dangerous. Increased death rates are noted in the Physicians Desk Reference, due to the the former medication. The latter pharmaceutical agent contains this caution, “A causal role has been demonstrated with antidepressant use and emergence of suicidality in pediatric patients and young adults…”

Clinically, patients who have taken these drugs have shown markedly increased appetites (leading to obesity), exhibited new tics, demonstrated a ‘zombie-like’ affect, and have been very difficult to dose correctly. Breast enlargement and lactation have been reported with these meds, as well.

What does the FDA consider dangerous?
About metal-removing therapy, “FDA-approved chelating agents are approved for specific uses that do not include the treatment or cure of autism, such as the treatment of lead poisoning and iron overload, and are available by prescription only.” So, this government organization has determined that environmental poisoning is not a cause of autism.

Hyperbaric oxygen treatment has been cleared by the “FDA only for certain medical uses, such as treating decompression sickness suffered by divers.” The document failed to mention that it has been proven effective for non-healing wounds and post-traumatic stress disorder, as well.

Clay baths, and “… various products, including raw camel milk and essential oils. These products have been marketed as a treatment for autism or autism-related symptoms, but have not been proven safe and effective for these advertised uses.” Don’t expect millions of dollars to be poured into research about the effectiveness of these innocuous interventions.

If you wish to utilize essential oils,
do so at your own peril !

Discussion
The medical literature continues to question the usefulness of Abilify or Risperdal for the treatment of signs and symptoms of ASD. But it is perfectly clear that, even the supporting literature never makes any statement about apraxic children. Stopping the banging doesn’t produce speech. Plus, socialization only improves to the extent that these ‘safe’ drugs reduce unusual behaviors or decrease aggression.

Moreover, the body systems that are in need of repair and optimization do not get addressed – indeed, are even masked – by such a pharmacological bandaid, which leads to further complications. Often, this makes the child with increased resistance to pain even more stuck with their autistic behaviors. Difficulties in the gastrointestinal, immune, and nervous systems, go unrecognized. Mitochondrial functioning is affected, compounding metabolic challenges in this vicious cycle.

Parents seek ‘risky’ therapies because of the inadequacies of the medical profession in just about every aspect of autism diagnosis, prevention, treatment and care. Rather than elevating autism anxiety over the dangers of mostly mild, possibly helpful, but unproven interventions, we would be better served by an honest evaluation about the overuse of the ‘on-label’ products. This is especially true in disadvantaged populations. When functional medicine doctors, such as myself, utilize these drugs, it is usually as a last resort, after explaining risks/benefits to parents, with close follow-up of the patients’ condition.

Conclusion
TV commercials tout incredibly risky medications, for diseases that range from restless leg syndrome to cancer. “Ask your doctor,” we are told, “if this is a good drug for you!” Then, a list of very scary side effects is enumerated. Well, you could just ‘ask your doctor’ if camel milk will cause seizures or death.

Parents of children with developmental challenges have plenty of work to do, just getting through each day. This useless memorandum will, most probably, simply be ignored. For those who feel that the consumer update was produced to pursue some financial and/or political motivation, and/or is another example of bureaucratic waste, you may feel compelled to address the (ir)responsible organization (click here).

Processing Disorders are Autism

Sunday, February 12th, 2017

With all of the professionals who care for individuals experiencing signs and symptoms that are presently classified as ASD, it isn’t surprising that the organization of problems reflects the point of view of each discipline.

To the extent that nomenclature describes identifiable, clearly understood pathways, it can improve our understanding of function (or the lack thereof), as it relates to structure (but not necessarily vise-versa). Often, however, researchers utilize long, complicated terms that merely restate the obvious. Such designations may not provide additional insight, which is sorely needed if we are to reverse the named condition.

Selective eating disorder = picky eater

Visual processing disorder = sees things differently

Auditory processing disorder = hears things differently

Sensory processing disorder = feels things differently

Oppositional defiance disorder = responds to everything the opposite way

Attention deficit disorder = won’t focus on non-preferred activities

Hyperactivity disorder = can’t sit still

ADHD = both of the above

Sleep disorder = takes longer to fall asleep, wakes up frequently, or both

Social anxiety disorder = uncomfortable around others

Obsessive compulsive disorder = repetitive behaviors and restricted interests

Cognitive processing disorder =?Executive functioning disorder = ?Motor planning disorder = ?expressive language deficiency = ?receptive language disruption = ?doesn’t (appear to) learn/listen/remember.

Discussion
Each of these labels accurately reflects some condition frequently experienced by individuals with ASD. Professionals may utilize such information to address a patient’s issues, but it can be quite confusing when complex jargon is invoked to explain an intervention to the family.

“Why is my child exhibiting this aberrant behavior?” Until much more research identifies actual, measurable, specific physiological states, my response is, “Signals sometimes go to the right place and can perform the appropriate function, the wrong place and lead to an incorrect response, or just bounce around and diminish.”

At least, an understanding about, and explanation of, similar terms utilized by other disciplines would ease parents’ concerns that, “Somebody missed something,” about their child.

Conclusion
I recently spoke with a mom who was told about a feedback loop issue in her child with motor planning deficiencies and sensory processing difficulties. Each therapist provided a valid diagnostic label. I suggested that she focus on the skills required in order for her 4 year-old to play with other children.

Rather than invoking esoteric, complicated language as to theoretical cause, the focus should be on assisting patients’ ability to achieve required skills, such as spontaneous speech, self-control, eye contact, motor proficiency and socialization.

Smooth, efficient processing between our body and brain is the goal. In human development, when systems fail to mesh in the correct fashion, what we observe is called autism.

TheAutismDoctor’s Top Stories

Friday, December 30th, 2016

As I have previously explained, I produce this blogpost for 4 principle reasons; to learn, to teach, to offer a middle-ground, and to ventilate about the less-than-state-of-the-art medical care offered to patients with autism and ADHD. Here are my picks for 2016’s most useful stories:

January
In An Autism Prevention, we learned about medications taken during pregnancy that could be contributing to the autism epidemic. Pharmaceutical preparations that have become ubiquitous in this century are suspect. Reducing their intake could result in a decrease in the number of new cases.

February
Americans With Autism Act. This was my opportunity to blow off steam about a local fight to get a student with ASD the necessary and deserved services. The outcome was in direct conflict with decades-long evidence that ABA works.

March
I often give advice about the difficult problem with Speech Apraxia. This article lamented the sad state of affairs regarding scientific identification of the problem, let alone workable solutions.
(Happily, this situation has been somewhat addressed in this recent, randomized study utilizing folinic acid.)

April
Vaccination Redux was this year’s best effort to explain my position on the childhood vaccination schedule. What can I say? The problem won’t be resolved by bullying or vaccine industry-supported research. BTW, I am not against childhood vaccinations.

May
Folate Issues. Folic acid has been in the news throughout the year. This story was about too much of a good thing, if taken during pregnancy. Obviously this vitamin, and the pathways that are involved, are very important to our understanding of the autism mystery.

June
The importance of Genetic Testing in Autism was my opportunity to spread the word that a modern medical workup should include appropriate laboratory testing, including a chromosomal microarray. The subject material is dense, but key to understanding one group of autisms.

July
Acetaminophen and Autism presented scientific evidence to warn about the casual us of this potential culprit. Four studies were made available, so pregnant women should take note, and seek more acceptable alternatives for relief.

August
In Digital Devices and Autism, I expressed my opinion to the frequently asked question, “Is it OK to give junior the iThing?” Children who seem to gain real academic benefit are few. Mostly, iStuff provides no imagination and no socialization, fueling core deficiencies in ASD.

September
Processing Disorders and Autism, crystallizes a decade of my understanding about this set of childhood developmental and physical disorders.
By connecting the dots about the various maladies that affect patients, such as sensory processing, GI problems, and low core muscle tone, we achieve a greater understanding about the causes, and downstream behavioral effects.

October
Just in case pediatricians haven’t noticed the epidemic, and because the US Preventative Task Force has recommended against formal testing, I continue to write at least one Early Signs post each year, to enlighten the unenlightened.

November
Medical school exposes students to very-little-to-zero information about alternative healing services; such as chiropractic, naturopathic, and homeopathic remedies. This story was about my research and experience as relates to the turmeric plant. Its antioxidant properties have helped our patients with gastrointestinal, behavioral and even developmental challenges.

December
A bit of levity. I have spent months perfecting the 12 Days of Autism Christmas.
Perhaps, next year I’ll attempt to furnish new lyrics for Dreidel, Dreidel, Dreidel.

Conclusion
This is TheAutismDoctor’s year-end opportunity to rediscover the polarized world of Special Needs Pediatric diagnosis and treatment. My articles take a great deal of time, study, and thought. So, they are all important to me, and should be helpful for families and professionals, as well.

Gut Anxiety?

Sunday, November 20th, 2016

Sherryjpg

Dr. Sherry Eshraghi, of Natural Health Power Works has been consulting with families at The Child Development Center of America, where she provides knowledgeable advice about nutrition and naturopathic intervention.

This week (11/16), Dr. Sherry writes:

If you have ever had a panic attack, you are well aware of how bad it feels. Many sufferers have it on a regular basis, others have experienced only occasional short periods of these episodes.

Often, the feeling comes out of the blue; even in a relaxed state, while reading a book, watching a movie, sitting in a park…
Suddenly you start feeling light-headed, dizzy, your pulse starts racing and you feel like you are going to have a heart attack. You feel like you can’t catch your breath and then the panic sets in, mostly the feeling that you are going to die.

The reaction can be so overwhelming that you phone for an ambulance, or go to the emergency room. After a thorough check-up, you may be informed that you are fully healthy and nothing is wrong. If you are given an accurate diagnosis – that you’ve had a panic attack – you feel dumbfounded and incredulous. When you start having regular anxiety spells, you may become concerned that something is wrong with you mentally. Perhaps you start taking medications that might, or might not, work.

But don’t worry…you are not crazy! Although prolonged stress can trigger anxiety attacks, there are other factors that play a role but are often overlooked. Generally, people do not pay attention to the earliest signs – feeling gassy, belching, passing gas, or that their bowel habit has changed.

serotonin-emoji-2You have probably heard about the fascinating research demonstrating that there is a gut-brain connection. Indeed, the gut is often referred to as our ‘second brain’. In fact, a very important neurotransmitter – serotonin – is primarily produced in the abdomen. A deficiency in the chemical can cause anxiety, poor sleep, inability to focus, agitation and mood swings, depression, and more.

What leads to a deficiency in serotonin?
Prolonged stress, leaky gut, malabsorption, inadequate nutrient dense foods, food allergies and lack of beneficial gut bacteria are all culprits. Recent studies show that gut bacteria are key components in the production of serotonin.

What can you do to prevent and minimize the number of anxiety attacks?
Heal your gastrointestinal system! Get a food allergy test, replenish the gut with beneficial bacteria, reduce sugar and processed foods, adopt an anti-inflammatory diet, exercise regularly and learn to manage your stress early on.

Remember, you’re not out of your mind…
It’s all in your gut!

Sources:
Emeran A. Mayer, Rob Knight, Sarkis K. Mazmanian, et al., “Gut Microbes and the Brain: Paradigm Shift in Neuroscience”, Journal of Neuroscience, 2014
Jessica M. Yano, Kristie Yu, et al, “Indigenous Bacteria from the Gut Microbiota Regulate Host Serotonin Biosynthesis”, Cell, 2015

Processing Disorders and Autism

Sunday, September 18th, 2016

EEGleftThere are a number of newly-minted diagnoses that have been invented to explain many of the symptoms of the modern epidemic that covers autism.

They include:

 Sensory Processing Disorder
→ Visual Processing Disorder
→ Auditory Processing Disorder
→ Oppositional Defiance Disorder
→ Attention Deficit Disorder
→ Hyperactivity Disorder

→ Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder
→ Anxiety Disorder
→ Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
→ Explosive Disorder
→ Social Processing Disorder

Diagnosis:
These conditions frequently display such similar general patterns that, depending on a practitioner’s inclination to be a ‘splitter’ or a ‘lumper’, the available treatment regimens could vary widely. For example, AD and HD are usually treated as ADHD, with stimulant medications, even though inattention, poor focus, distractibility and hyperactivity may arise from a variety of physiological conditions.

Likewise, aggression, obsessive – compulsive behaviors, and opposition are usually prescribed anti-anxiety medications, such as Risperdone, Abilify, Intuniv, or even Prozac and Zoloft.

pd1©TheAutismDoctor.com

Some are more or less related, and others may be merely due to immaturity, therefore patience and time will yield preferable results.

Treatments:
It is not difficult to imagine that processing difficulties in vision, hearing, touch, and the other senses, can lead to signs, such as repetitive behaviors or ‘stimming’, to alleviate the sensory overload. Supplements, such as magnesium, turmeric, epsom salt baths, essential oils and even HBOT could address those issues, in addition to traditional therapies. Most parents of children with ASD own at least one trampoline.

Restricted interests and repetitive behaviors are core problems in patients with autism. They are not OCD, and the usual medications are rarely effective, even though the diagnosis prompts traditional physicians to prescribe higher, more frequent doses, and/or a combination of pharmaceutical preparations.

The recognition that processing difficulties underly these unusual behaviors has engendered the protocols that include ABA, PT, OT and other specialty therapies. They require significant resources, but have demonstrated improved outcomes. Certainly this approach is not as risky or potentially harmful as potent medications.

Anxiety appears to be a result of a combination of the other processing difficulties, and social processing disorder is as real as any of the other contrived diagnoses. Early socialization is, therefore, a useful intervention. The fewer pharmacological interventions, the less chance that they will poison the growing brain.

On another hand, certain abnormalities seem to be a result of difficulties in other-than-CNS processing. Aggression, opposition, and explosive behaviors are frequently gut-related. The recognition that autistic behaviors can be ameliorated by restoring the gastrointestinal microbiome has assisted many patients who have been suffering for years.

Conclusions:
The biomedical approach is unique in the treatment of this myriad of medical conditions because the basic assumption is that they are due to a variety of upstream difficulties.

The recognition that, in patients with autism, some neural pathways proceed down the right path, others stumble upon an incorrect route, some thoughts don’t propagate at all, while other symptoms are emanating from elsewhere, goes a long way to assisting patients in their improvement.

Practicing Autism Treatment

Sunday, June 12th, 2016

The identification of supplements, medications, or protocols that demonstrate safety and usefulness in each individual patient of a certain age and sex, who exhibits a specific set of signs and symptoms, is certainly the most daunting part of this new practice of Pediatric Special Needs medicine.

This week, we received some great news about two of our patients with significant speech delay. Both have been has been getting treatment at The Child Development Center for ~18-24 months, experiencing significant speech apraxia that has been resolving only very slowly, in spite of the usual alternative protocols.

 5 year-old Harry:
Hello Dr. Udell,
I met Billy’s mom, who also sees you. Also by chance, ironically she goes to the same speech therapy place as Harry. We started talking and she suggested I put Harry on a special diet. I have amazing news to report. I am not sure if it is coincidence, but I put Harry on a very strict Gluten free/Casein free/Soy free/Sugar free diet this past Saturday (6/4) and on 6/7 he started talking!!!! He is mostly repeating when I prompt him, most of the language is prompted and a lot of it is not completely clear, you can make out what he is saying though. Very similar to when a child first starts talking. He has said in excess of 70 new words in the past 2 days, not including words he is repeating!!!! I am so excited. I am not sure if you can review the supplements he is taking and let me know if you want me to change anything?? Do you want me to give more B12 shots?? He is currently taking them twice a week. Now that he is “talking” I am not sure if we should alter anything and wanted your opinion/advice. I am going to stop in shortly to pick up more glutathione so please let me know… His bowel movements are improving/changing as well. Please let me know what you think and I will bring him with me next week when I pick up more supplements and have him say “hi” to you…. literally!!!!

dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;"> Thank you so much Dr. Udell!!!
dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;">Dr. U
What a great response… honestly, it’s hard to know why, ’cause he didn’t show a significant IgG elevation against those foods..
It’s peculiar that for some, an SCD diet, GAPS diet, or other specific protocol, helps so much and others not at all.
I would just continue whatever you are doing right now without any changes.
Thanks so much for this information.
As long as you do not mind, I plan on using this as a blog – I will, of course, leave the names anonymous… but it would help so many others re-double their efforts.

Mom
Absolutely, and you can use our names, I don’t mind! (anonymity anyway). I am all for helping as many people as I can with whatever information necessary! I am so grateful to you Dr. Udell for all you have helped us with, I know its still a long road but I am more hopeful then ever. Let me know when you would like to see him next. I will see you sometime next week when I stop in to pick u more GSH…..

 7 year-old Bobby:
Hello wanted to share great news. Bobby scored above average in Reading Comprehension and average in Math. He was promoted to first grade with no issues. Next year he will be in a  Gen Ed classroom for 90 minutes, 5 days a week. He will also share specials and events with his Gen Ed class. 

The teachers wrote, “In the past year, Bobby has come such a long way! Beyond our expectations. God is good. First grade, here we come!!!!”
We would like to thank Dr Udell and his wonderful caring team!  We feel blessed!
Dr. U
What great news… Thanks to all your persistence and hard work, as well.
Really appreciate this update.
Regards,

Discussion
Autism recovery is a marathon, not a sprint. Parents are sometimes quite frustrated when they observe only a fraction of the improvement that they had expected, after only 3 or 4 visits over 6 or 9 months.

Those who discontinue modern alternative autism treatments, delivered by a trained, experienced medical practitioner, are relinquishing valuable time and opportunities for improvement.

Conclusion
The time that it takes to demonstrate improvement varies greatly from patient to patient. Often, the real miracles are the ones that percolate, not the occasional ‘great responder’ who gets better after one or two treatments (as seen on YouTube, of course).

When asked about which intervention generated the most improvement, many parents declare, “Im not sure what made my child better. It was a combination of the doctor and all of the various therapies.”

As long as medical intervention is affordable, safe, and effective, being part of the team that leads to improvement provides more than enough encouragement to continue the fight.

Neurodiversity and Autism

Sunday, April 3rd, 2016

Hands2We are not going to cure cancer. Eventually, medical science will successfully treat melanoma, breast cancer, or lymphoma. One disease at-a-time, with discovery and experience along the way. Likewise, there will come an understanding of the underlying causes, treatments and prevention for all the types and conditions that appear with signs and symptoms now considered ASD.

Calling the epidemic ‘Autism Spectrum Disorder’ is, paradoxically, both accurate and imprecise. It is valid to the extent that, given our present state of ignorance, there exists an array of individuals who fit a common diagnostic category. However, it comprises too many people with a myriad of conditions. Under the present state-of-the-art, there are those who are just, well, neuro-diverse!

Maybe it’s Asperger’s syndrome (OK to say, before DSM 5.0). Perhaps, it’s extreme ADHD, with a bit of sensory issues. There is oppositional behavior disorder, visual and/or auditory, sensory processing and executive function disorder. How about social processing disorder?

The A Word
A new BBC series entitled ‘The A Word’ was recently reviewed by the New York Times. While it’s admirable to expose the public to the challenges of families who are affected by this modern malady, as a pediatrician who has been practicing for over 40 years, the comments by one reviewer (who co-authored an article with his autistic daughter) gave me cause for concern.

“Years ago, black people or gay people were on telly purely as black people or gay people. Autistic people still are — they appear on programs purely as autistic people,” he said. “It would be great to see autistic people in TV dramas who are just there, like any other character.”

ARE YOU KIDDING ME?
Who ever said, “We need to hear more tuberculosis patients on the radio?” Or, “People with polio don’t appear enough on TV.” The scientific community astutely researched, understood, and successfully treated those emerging medical conditions.

It’s not just neurodiversity
This is why a more precise diagnosis is needed. So far, I see speech apraxia and oral-motor dysfunction (including extreme feeding disorders) as THE LINE. It impedes even the brightest and most talented of individuals.

In addition to the lack of communication, aggression (against self or others) is the most perplexing and difficult-to-treat feature of ASD. In toddlers, negative behaviors usually emanate from discomfort, pain, or unmet needs. It is the discovery and treatment of such co-morbidities that enables clinicians to successfully address those youngest patients. As children age, that lack of contact and the frustration that accompanies loneliness and isolation often result in tantrums or other negative behaviors.

Discussion
By the way, the difficulty is with speech and communication, not S&L. Patients are not ‘confused’ by multiple languages, ‘spoiled’ by grandparents, or ‘isolated’ by numerous siblings. In our multi-cultural world, the most incommunicative children can follow directions given by a variety of non-English-speaking caregivers. Additionally, even sign language is difficult for those who are most affected.

I’m all for embracing the neurodiverse universe. Its inhabitants are interesting and have provided the horsepower for imagination that has helped change the world. When people who are different require special instruction or more understanding, popularizing their plight makes sense.

Conclusion
Doctors are not seeking to  ‘cure’ neurodiversity. On the contrary, we ought to learn about different brains and embrace their uniqueness. However, to the extent that autism is considered “Locked in autism silent prison,” practitioners need to understand and treat this enigmatic medical condition.

There is neurodiversity. And, there are autisms.

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