Posts Tagged ‘GF diet’

The Real Cause of Autism

Sunday, October 8th, 2017

Recently, these 3 headlines appeared on my iRadar Screens:

Genetics a Cause of Autism in Most Cases: Study
 Korean-American Professor Couple Identify Major Cause of Autism
 Could multivitamin use in pregnancy protect children from autism?

Yet, the research was entitled:

The Heritability of Autism Spectrum Disorder
Mum’s bacteria linked to baby’s behavior
Antenatal nutritional supplementation and autism spectrum disorders in the Stockholm youth cohort: population based cohort study

And, the papers covered the following data:

The examiners mathematically re-analyzed decades-old Swedish registry information that strengthened the association with genetic factors. About the findings the lead author has admitted, “our results do not give any information about specific genes or other direct causes. It only informs us that genes are important…. our study cannot shed any light” on the reason for higher rates.

This was published in Nature, entitled, Maternal gut bacteria promote neurodevelopmental abnormalities in mouse offspring. “The couple found that certain bacteria in the mother’s digestive tract can lead to having an autistic child. Furthermore, they found the exact brain location linked to autistic behaviors, which can be used to find a cure for autism.” Mice are not men.

Using a similar Swedish cohort as the first study, authors reviewed supplementation with multivitamins, iron and folate. They concluded that, “Maternal multivitamin supplementation during pregnancy may be inversely associated with ASD with intellectual disability in offspring.”

Discussion
All of the information first appeared in reputable journals. The stories took a turn through leading health and science magazines, and finally popular media announced theories as if they were dogma. Often, autism research is subject to the ‘telephone game’, resulting in overstated and oversimplified claims masquerading as explanations for complicated medical concepts.

Nevertheless, these investigations represent clues, directions to be pursued, possible new treatments and even prevention. It’s so confusing because they document only baby steps in this scientific puzzle.

Conclusion 
Rather than view these studies as disparate, an alternative perspective could be something like:
If autism is the result of a susceptible individual (genetic study) affected by an environmental stress (mouse study), then utilizing a metabolic intervention (third study) might make sense.

Fathers and Autism

Sunday, June 18th, 2017

The diagnosis of autism seems more difficult for the Dads. We are simply not wired to easily accept deviations from expected norms. For the entire gestation, through the first 15+ months, it’s mostly Mother who is feeding, going to medical visits, and communicating with the new child. So, when development lags and socialization ceases to flow, there is often an extra bit of frustration and disappointment.

This is an ode that I wrote 5 years ago, updated for today’s families who affected by autism:

Warrior Dads. Concerned Dads. Curious, watchful, insightful. Patience.
Sometimes, not so patient.
 
Hard working Dads. Smart… trying anyway. Good husbands… trying anyway.
Sometimes, it works.
 
Miniature cars. Trains. Crayons. Getting them in just the right order.
Spinning. Wheels. Fans. Is that a ‘stim’?
 
Sleep – please. Poop – ?too little ?too much
Toilet training. Communicate!
 
Catch. Football. Soccer.
Maybe, have to wait a little while.
 
Education. Vacation. Camp.
IEPs.
 
Movies. Computers. iPads. iPad Apps.
Youtube. Too much repetition?
 
Wii. xBox. Video games.
On to another (non-preferred) activity. 
 
Decisions. Schools. Therapists. Drugs.
Opinions. Treatment options. Vaccinations. 
 
Doctors. Specialists. Alternative doctors. Naturopaths.
Homeopaths. Chiropractors. Nutritionists. B12 shots.
 
Appointments. Medications. Therapies. Supplements.
Money. Money. Money. More money.
 
Rare Holidays. Vacations. Exercise. Hobbies.
Planning for Restaurants. Shopping. Errands. 
 
Looking for Smiles. Playing with Toys. Chase.
Bouncing. Lots of bouncing.
 
Swimming. Horseback riding. Pet turtle.
Dr. Udell’s fish tank.
 
Finding activities. Yoga for kids. Summer camp scholarships.
Sensory friendly films. Thanks, Autism Society, and other local organizations.
 
Missing Cheeseburgers. Pizza. Mac & cheese. P&J.
Gluten free/ Casein free – Are these French Fries OK?
 
Sisters, brothers, grandparents, in-laws, cousins.
Peers. Precious few friends. 
 
Homework. Practice. Play. 
Worrying. Teaching. Learning.

 It’s all good. You’re a great Dad.
Happy Fathers Day !

© theautismdoctor.com

FDA Warning About Autism Treatment

Sunday, April 16th, 2017

The FDA took the time, this week (4/2017), to sound an alarm about their notion of potentially dangerous off-label ASD treatments, by issuing, “Autism: Beware of Potentially Dangerous Therapies and Products“.

The consumer update begins, “One thing that is important to know about autism up front: There is no cure for autism. So, products or treatments claiming to “cure” autism do not work as claimed. The same is true of many products claiming to “treat” autism or autism-related symptoms. Some may carry significant health risks.” Really?

What are the approved therapies?
According to the document, the antipsychotic drugs Risperdal (risperidone) and Abilify (aripiprazole) are apparently not considered to be that dangerous. Increased death rates are noted in the Physicians Desk Reference, due to the the former medication. The latter pharmaceutical agent contains this caution, “A causal role has been demonstrated with antidepressant use and emergence of suicidality in pediatric patients and young adults…”

Clinically, patients who have taken these drugs have shown markedly increased appetites (leading to obesity), exhibited new tics, demonstrated a ‘zombie-like’ affect, and have been very difficult to dose correctly. Breast enlargement and lactation have been reported with these meds, as well.

What does the FDA consider dangerous?
About metal-removing therapy, “FDA-approved chelating agents are approved for specific uses that do not include the treatment or cure of autism, such as the treatment of lead poisoning and iron overload, and are available by prescription only.” So, this government organization has determined that environmental poisoning is not a cause of autism.

Hyperbaric oxygen treatment has been cleared by the “FDA only for certain medical uses, such as treating decompression sickness suffered by divers.” The document failed to mention that it has been proven effective for non-healing wounds and post-traumatic stress disorder, as well.

Clay baths, and “… various products, including raw camel milk and essential oils. These products have been marketed as a treatment for autism or autism-related symptoms, but have not been proven safe and effective for these advertised uses.” Don’t expect millions of dollars to be poured into research about the effectiveness of these innocuous interventions.

If you wish to utilize essential oils,
do so at your own peril !

Discussion
The medical literature continues to question the usefulness of Abilify or Risperdal for the treatment of signs and symptoms of ASD. But it is perfectly clear that, even the supporting literature never makes any statement about apraxic children. Stopping the banging doesn’t produce speech. Plus, socialization only improves to the extent that these ‘safe’ drugs reduce unusual behaviors or decrease aggression.

Moreover, the body systems that are in need of repair and optimization do not get addressed – indeed, are even masked – by such a pharmacological bandaid, which leads to further complications. Often, this makes the child with increased resistance to pain even more stuck with their autistic behaviors. Difficulties in the gastrointestinal, immune, and nervous systems, go unrecognized. Mitochondrial functioning is affected, compounding metabolic challenges in this vicious cycle.

Parents seek ‘risky’ therapies because of the inadequacies of the medical profession in just about every aspect of autism diagnosis, prevention, treatment and care. Rather than elevating autism anxiety over the dangers of mostly mild, possibly helpful, but unproven interventions, we would be better served by an honest evaluation about the overuse of the ‘on-label’ products. This is especially true in disadvantaged populations. When functional medicine doctors, such as myself, utilize these drugs, it is usually as a last resort, after explaining risks/benefits to parents, with close follow-up of the patients’ condition.

Conclusion
TV commercials tout incredibly risky medications, for diseases that range from restless leg syndrome to cancer. “Ask your doctor,” we are told, “if this is a good drug for you!” Then, a list of very scary side effects is enumerated. Well, you could just ‘ask your doctor’ if camel milk will cause seizures or death.

Parents of children with developmental challenges have plenty of work to do, just getting through each day. This useless memorandum will, most probably, simply be ignored. For those who feel that the consumer update was produced to pursue some financial and/or political motivation, and/or is another example of bureaucratic waste, you may feel compelled to address the (ir)responsible organization (click here).

ADHD Medication Guide

Sunday, January 8th, 2017

As the academic season becomes more challenging, The Child Development Center is often asked about the various pharmaceutical preparations that are suggested by doctors, behavioral and academic personnel. Specific medicines are frequently prescribed for symptoms that include poor focus and attention, hyperactivity, distractibility, fidgeting, not listening, a short fuse, and lack of self control.

As parents ponder this important decision, here is a useful list to improve understanding and address frequent concerns, in decreasing order of potency and side effects:

Prescription
Methamphetamines

Names: AdderallDesoxynAdzenysDianavelEvekeo, Dexedrine, ProCentra, Zenzeti
Plus Lisdexamphetamine (Vyvanse)

Class – Stimulant, Amphetamine
Comment: These were the first generation of stimulants. They are the most addictive, bring about appetite suppression (‘diet’ pills), create sleep disturbance and growth suppression. Families should consider using these when less potent preparations fail.

Methyphenidates
Names: Methylin, Methylphenidate, Ritalin, Concerta, Daytrona, Quillivant, Quillichew, Aptensio
Plus Dexmethyphenidate (Focalin)

Class –  Psychostimulant, Methylphenidate derivates
Comment: There are actually only two choices in this category, as well. The theory of using stimulant medications for ADHD is that affected patients experience a paradoxical reaction to the invigorating effects that neurotypical individuals would sense.

From a chemical standpoint, all of these names pare down to just 4 compounds. They share these common features:
DEA – Class Rx Schedule 2. Therefore, your doctor will be very careful about documentation and prescription handling, and will require followup visits.
The choices here are usually driven by the formulation; available as a liquid, chewable, patch, pill, or capsule configurations.
Plus, manufacturers offer a myriad of confusing dosage options; from 1, to multiples of 5, to multiples of 10, to multiples of 18 milligrams.
When the medications start to wear off, there is often an increase in negative behaviors. For this reason, dosage and frequency are crucial to produce the most effective amelioration of symptoms.
However, insurance companies have become very restrictive in the preparations that they will cover, and out-of-pocket costs are high. When trying to achieve the optimal medication schedule, such stipulations complicate making the best clinical decisions.
The medical risks of any of these preparations include a myriad of cardiac maladies. The AAP no longer recommends a pediatric cardiology evaluation. This is not a good idea, and once a patient demonstrates that they will continue to take these prescriptions, The Child Development Center refers to the appropriate specialist.

Atomoxitine
Names: Strattera
Class – Non-stimulant
DEA Class – Rx
Comment – Frequently vaunted as THE ‘non-stimulant ADHD medication’. Besides an increased risk of suicidal ideation, significant growth inhibition and sudden death, in my experience, it has never been a useful choice. Really, don’t bother with this remedy.

Phosphatidylserine
Names: Vayarin, PS 100
Class – Non-stimulant
DEA Class – Medical food
Comment – The active ingredient is a natural fat that is supposed to aid cell-to-cell communication in the brain. The name brand contains an omega 3 oil, and requires a prescription. The over-the-counter product might be preferable if the patient is allergic to fish or soy.

Non-Prescription Stimulants
Despite a 2004 study that demonstrated that nicotine was equivalent to methylphenidate in ADHD symptom reduction, the practice has not become popular due to the inability to control the patch dosage and skin discomfort. However, the effects of caffeine may provide a reasonable alternative. At The Child Development Center, pure caffeine is chosen over coffee, tea or other products that contain a multitude of other ingredients, in order to objectively assess the results of administration.

Conclusions
1. The most important factor in deciding on treatment is a precise diagnosis, which requires a thorough history, physical examination, and appropriate laboratory testing. A doctor cannot simply look at your child and declare that they have ADHD.

2. Medication administration continues to be offered to younger and younger children. Deferring pharmaceutical intervention can mitigate against the most significant side effects.

3. When stimulants are initiated, it is not unusual for parents to observe that, either the med doesn’t work quickly as expected, or that the child acts like a ‘zombie’, or that the child exhibits even more hyperactive behaviors.

4. Although this guide is presented in order of medicinal ‘strength’, whether a product works depends on a myriad of factors. Preparations that are lower on the list may be far superior to more potent formulas. Plus, the mere observation that the child is sitting still does not necessarily reflect that real learning is taking place.

5. Research continues to demonstrate that appropriate behavioral therapy is a useful and effective treatment.

Curcumin for Autism and ADHD

Sunday, November 27th, 2016
Turmeric plant

Turmeric plant

Over the past year, The Child Development Center has been successfully utilizing a natural supplement (Enhansa®) that appears to be improving the health of our patients’ gastrointestinal system, body and mind.

The turmeric plant and its product, curcumin, have been the subject of a number of media reports, lately. How can the preparation help patients with ADHD and ASD?

Turmeric subsoil stems>powder>curcumin molecule

Turmeric subsoil stems>powder>curcumin molecule

What it is
Turmeric is part of the ginger family, mostly known for its role as the main spice in curry. Curcuminoid compounds are utilized to treat a variety of medical conditions; including auto-immunity in the blood, rashes in the skin, problems with the gut, parasites within the body, and disorders of the liver, kidney, and brain.

Why it works
Many doctors ask, “How can one chemical help so many diverse conditions?”
An emerging theme in the practice of modern medicine is the ability of an affected body part to heal itself. Such a belief has been central to other therapeutic sciences for a long time. In that paradigm, natural substances that promote repair are at least as important as medicines that attack a presumed cause.

Turmeric contains curcumin, which possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Given that the compound successfully accomplishes those tasks, improvements in the efficiency and function of any organ throughout the body should be understandable.

How it is administered
Various preparations have been marketed as the ‘best’ formulation; including pills, crushed, with/without taste, and offerings from numerous manufacturers. Powder with black pepper is popular.

Similar to most medications, it is best to go ‘low and slow’. As the patient displays individual tolerance to a given pattern, the dose and/or frequency can be adjusted.

Effects
We have received lots of emails describing a variety of results – mostly positive, some negative, all instructive:
I have noticed great improvements in cognition and language with your suggested supplement. She seems a little more irritable, but the the gains are so good.
-The curcumin has been amazing. Improved language and cognition. Significant improvements.
-He felt warm for two days, but never registered a fever. He is doing amazing in school! He is now sitting with the other kids and doing his seat work. According to the school staff, they have witnessed attempts to talk and word approximations. The ABA therapist visited him at school yesterday, and reported the same. She is extremely pleased with his progress, and we are as well. I’m going to send you a picture.
-Our child reacted well to the turmeric and LDN compound. At first we thought he had a reaction to it, but he was getting sick. We have continued on the path and he seems to be reacting nicely. He is babbling much more and mood has improved…
-This supplement has been amazing so far at 75 mg bid. Her focus and sustained attention and receptive language are much improved and all her therapists across the board have noticed!
-It has been amazing. Improved language and cognition. Significant improvements.

Side Effects
I also wanted to ask, his poop has turned yellowish, it used to be dark brown. Is this normal with the supplements?
Changes in the color of urine and stool are due to the intense yellow color.
Our child was on the product for two days and an intense rash developed around his eyes! I stopped giving it, and it is slowly getting better.
Rashes are the most common side effect, so far. Reducing the dose often improves the problem, but close medical supervision is paramount.

Conclusion
As with all medical interventions, your child should be under the care of an experienced practitioner who can make specific recommendations. It is impossible to test all brands. Patients and problems are so diverse that, generally, doctors stick with the supplements with which we become most familiar.

When given to the appropriate population, with close followup of the clinical course, adding curcumin to the treatment protocol appears safe, and can provide significant improvement for patients with ASD.

cumin

Cumin plant, powder, seeds

By the way
Curcumin is not cumin, which is a different spice that is derived from seeds. Both products are used in curry. They share many similar flavoring and medicinal properties.

 

Gut Anxiety?

Sunday, November 20th, 2016

Sherryjpg

Dr. Sherry Eshraghi, of Natural Health Power Works has been consulting with families at The Child Development Center of America, where she provides knowledgeable advice about nutrition and naturopathic intervention.

This week (11/16), Dr. Sherry writes:

If you have ever had a panic attack, you are well aware of how bad it feels. Many sufferers have it on a regular basis, others have experienced only occasional short periods of these episodes.

Often, the feeling comes out of the blue; even in a relaxed state, while reading a book, watching a movie, sitting in a park…
Suddenly you start feeling light-headed, dizzy, your pulse starts racing and you feel like you are going to have a heart attack. You feel like you can’t catch your breath and then the panic sets in, mostly the feeling that you are going to die.

The reaction can be so overwhelming that you phone for an ambulance, or go to the emergency room. After a thorough check-up, you may be informed that you are fully healthy and nothing is wrong. If you are given an accurate diagnosis – that you’ve had a panic attack – you feel dumbfounded and incredulous. When you start having regular anxiety spells, you may become concerned that something is wrong with you mentally. Perhaps you start taking medications that might, or might not, work.

But don’t worry…you are not crazy! Although prolonged stress can trigger anxiety attacks, there are other factors that play a role but are often overlooked. Generally, people do not pay attention to the earliest signs – feeling gassy, belching, passing gas, or that their bowel habit has changed.

serotonin-emoji-2You have probably heard about the fascinating research demonstrating that there is a gut-brain connection. Indeed, the gut is often referred to as our ‘second brain’. In fact, a very important neurotransmitter – serotonin – is primarily produced in the abdomen. A deficiency in the chemical can cause anxiety, poor sleep, inability to focus, agitation and mood swings, depression, and more.

What leads to a deficiency in serotonin?
Prolonged stress, leaky gut, malabsorption, inadequate nutrient dense foods, food allergies and lack of beneficial gut bacteria are all culprits. Recent studies show that gut bacteria are key components in the production of serotonin.

What can you do to prevent and minimize the number of anxiety attacks?
Heal your gastrointestinal system! Get a food allergy test, replenish the gut with beneficial bacteria, reduce sugar and processed foods, adopt an anti-inflammatory diet, exercise regularly and learn to manage your stress early on.

Remember, you’re not out of your mind…
It’s all in your gut!

Sources:
Emeran A. Mayer, Rob Knight, Sarkis K. Mazmanian, et al., “Gut Microbes and the Brain: Paradigm Shift in Neuroscience”, Journal of Neuroscience, 2014
Jessica M. Yano, Kristie Yu, et al, “Indigenous Bacteria from the Gut Microbiota Regulate Host Serotonin Biosynthesis”, Cell, 2015

Getting Children to Take Their Supplements & Medications

Sunday, October 30th, 2016

take-medA common feature among children who suffer from sensory processing issues is their reluctance to take the very preparations that would help attenuate such disturbances, and the will to get their way.

Here are some tips and observations, gathered over the years at the Child Development Center of America, that may be of some use as a parent attempts to cajole junior into ‘taking his medicine.’

B-twelve lollipops simply don’t cut it. There are various strategies for those who won’t take subcutaneously administered methyl-B12, from a middle-of-the-night sneak attack, to an early morning assault. Expensive topical anesthetic agents are rarely required or helpful. Squeamish parents may hire a nurse, or ask a friend or relative. In school, we practiced on fruit. Occasionally, there have been parents who take their child to the doctor, until they become more comfortable.

Dermal creams can be an excellent alternative. Naltrexone administered in this manner may alleviate sensory issues and enable more generalized compliance. Magnesium, epsom salt baths and other agents may be quite helpful. On the other hand, every supplement does not work in a cream form, due to its composition and absorption.
This is a propitious time to mention the use of essential oils. Calming to the mind and body, these may be just the ticket for getting a mildly oppositional youngster to comply.

Many families mix preparations with preferred liquids and foods. Should a parent risk a small volume of casein or other forbidden fare? Frankly, occasionally, that may be the better option. On the other hand, some children may then refuse taking even that ONE liquid that they consider acceptable. Starting with very low doses of the offending agent may work.
We recommend oil-based products for the like; e.g. almond butter or mustard, if the supplement comes in that form. Applesauce is good for gloppy goodies.

Some children may respond to mechanical strategies, such as practicing with candy, drinking fluid first, or placing the pill in just the right part of the tongue. Another strategy involves the use of a pill swallowing cup. A non-scientific review of our experience at The Center has not found those of any real value. They look scary, and we couldn’t give them away.

Ask the occupational, behavioral or physical therapist to assist in the learning process. To the extent that the professional recognizes – and believes in – the accompanying improvements for their job, they should embrace their role in assisting the process. In a similar vein, alternative techniques practiced by chiropractors and reflexologists might include their additional expertise in helping a child acquire this skill.

Social stories may be a great aid for certain children. An artistic parent may even be able to create one (digital or analog) with your child’s pictures and voices, enabling the child to view the process and diminish anxiety. The propensity for affected children to perseverate on youtube videos might provide an opportunity to encourage an understanding and acceptance of this technique.

Most parents have already exhausted the role of bribery. Often, families have found this strategy of limited benefit after a lifelong pursuit of compliance in one or another less-daunting behaviors. From this perspective, and towards this end, this could be utilized as one of the ONLY times that your child gets the iThing.

Make sure that the child is on the most healthful diet. For parents who believe that the foods their children eat have little to affect on behavior, you should at least give a try. The end point might be as ‘simple’ as your child’s understanding and compliance.

For certain preparations, there is always the rectal route. The child may accept that oral is preferable, if they don’t bite and run for the hills (and lock the door).
Sometimes this one can backfire – literally.

Develop the right attitude. With autism, the senses of smell, taste and texture are involved. Oral-motor functioning is weak. There are medical reasons for patient refusal. One inconsequential substance may be misperceived as awful, however another foul-smelling product may not even be noticed. Plus, some therapeutic protocols may increase aggressive behaviors for brief periods. For most children, reasoning is of little value. “Because mommy says so!”

Truth be told, only ~1% refuse just about everything. Such children won’t be told, taught, or tricked. The parent has to decide how important the supplement, how likely it is to work, and weigh the consequences of continued non-compliance. But, getting a child to accept only one or two of these preparations may jump start a pathway to increased compliance in other endeavors, as well.

I never had a juvenile arthritis patient, or child with diabetes or other significant malady, where the parent didn’t bite the bullet and do whatever is necessary. To the extent that the practitioner and parent believes in results, the deed will be done.

As always, knowledgeable and experienced parents are invited to offer their stellar suggestions…

Processing Disorders and Autism

Sunday, September 18th, 2016

EEGleftThere are a number of newly-minted diagnoses that have been invented to explain many of the symptoms of the modern epidemic that covers autism.

They include:

 Sensory Processing Disorder
→ Visual Processing Disorder
→ Auditory Processing Disorder
→ Oppositional Defiance Disorder
→ Attention Deficit Disorder
→ Hyperactivity Disorder

→ Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder
→ Anxiety Disorder
→ Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
→ Explosive Disorder
→ Social Processing Disorder

Diagnosis:
These conditions frequently display such similar general patterns that, depending on a practitioner’s inclination to be a ‘splitter’ or a ‘lumper’, the available treatment regimens could vary widely. For example, AD and HD are usually treated as ADHD, with stimulant medications, even though inattention, poor focus, distractibility and hyperactivity may arise from a variety of physiological conditions.

Likewise, aggression, obsessive – compulsive behaviors, and opposition are usually prescribed anti-anxiety medications, such as Risperdone, Abilify, Intuniv, or even Prozac and Zoloft.

pd1©TheAutismDoctor.com

Some are more or less related, and others may be merely due to immaturity, therefore patience and time will yield preferable results.

Treatments:
It is not difficult to imagine that processing difficulties in vision, hearing, touch, and the other senses, can lead to signs, such as repetitive behaviors or ‘stimming’, to alleviate the sensory overload. Supplements, such as magnesium, turmeric, epsom salt baths, essential oils and even HBOT could address those issues, in addition to traditional therapies. Most parents of children with ASD own at least one trampoline.

Restricted interests and repetitive behaviors are core problems in patients with autism. They are not OCD, and the usual medications are rarely effective, even though the diagnosis prompts traditional physicians to prescribe higher, more frequent doses, and/or a combination of pharmaceutical preparations.

The recognition that processing difficulties underly these unusual behaviors has engendered the protocols that include ABA, PT, OT and other specialty therapies. They require significant resources, but have demonstrated improved outcomes. Certainly this approach is not as risky or potentially harmful as potent medications.

Anxiety appears to be a result of a combination of the other processing difficulties, and social processing disorder is as real as any of the other contrived diagnoses. Early socialization is, therefore, a useful intervention. The fewer pharmacological interventions, the less chance that they will poison the growing brain.

On another hand, certain abnormalities seem to be a result of difficulties in other-than-CNS processing. Aggression, opposition, and explosive behaviors are frequently gut-related. The recognition that autistic behaviors can be ameliorated by restoring the gastrointestinal microbiome has assisted many patients who have been suffering for years.

Conclusions:
The biomedical approach is unique in the treatment of this myriad of medical conditions because the basic assumption is that they are due to a variety of upstream difficulties.

The recognition that, in patients with autism, some neural pathways proceed down the right path, others stumble upon an incorrect route, some thoughts don’t propagate at all, while other symptoms are emanating from elsewhere, goes a long way to assisting patients in their improvement.

Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs – Fall 2016

Sunday, September 11th, 2016

This week, the Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs held its semiannual conference in downtown Atlanta, GA. This is ‘Ground 0’ for practitioners, researchers and professors from all over the world to meet, learn, explore and discuss a myriad of relevant topics.

Members who have been returning for 100’s of lecture hours generally choose the advanced courses. For some, the conference has become a group of ~50 experienced and knowledgeable practitioners who meet to discuss ‘workups’, basic science, relevant research and treatment protocols for those who are most affected with ASD.

Notes and Observations
Day 1 – Tough Cases
I really enjoyed our lectures by the plain-speaking Dr. John Green, of Portland, OR. Dr. Green not only reviewed those who improved because of his medical expertise, but those who got better in spite of him, those who haven’t gotten better, those who got better but he can’t figure out why, and the most frustrating – patients who improve only to suffer frequent relapses.

Dr. Sid Baker, a pioneer of the biomedical movement, described his early medical experiences in Africa that morphed into his lifelong dedication to treating patients with ASD. He expressed his disappointment that so many conventional colleagues disagree with our practice.

Dr. Baker elucidated how he initiates care with new patients. He discussed increasingly resistant cases, covering topics from severe speech apraxia to the approach to children with injurious behaviors.

The first day was filled with the most frustrating and difficult cases you can imagine. Eminent practitioners Drs. James Neuenshwander, Michael Elice, and Julie Buckley challenged our diagnostic and therapeutic knowledge, attempting to navigate the complicated courses of those who improved and those who didn’t.

Day 2
Dr. Daniel Amen‘s morning lecture was entitled “3D Brain SPECT Imaging”. The takeaway message was that SPECT scans – technology – could/should/will become a mainstay for a multitude of CNS disorders. His manner and stories of research, technical evaluation, and clinical practice, were positively spellbinding and inspirational.

Dr. Theoharides presented his research and extensive knowledge about the important role of allergy in ASD. Dr. Theo continues to publish a mountain of monumental works, not only on the topics of autism and the role of mast cells, but treatments, as well.

Toxins were the subject of the afternoon’s lectures. We learned about the identification of substances in the environment that are dangerous, how they are measured, how damage is done, and the means to control and treat. For the skeptical reader, there was a plethora of supporting scientific evidence of the relationships to autism (and many other modern conditions).

As has become customary, Dr. Dan Rossignol rounded up the day with a roundup of all of the latest scientific research. Rapidly.

Day 3 – Advanced Clinical Cases
Severe behaviors and speech apraxia. For patients who are most resistant to conventional and alternative treatments, essential oils, acupuncture, and even worms were explored as possible solutions.

Throughout the afternoon, cases got even tougher! Lyme, Persistent Lyme, Non-Lyme Lyme, PANDAS, PANS, parasites… an increasing number of reasons to have signs and symptoms that are called autism. Such information extends our knowledge and leads to better diagnoses for our patients, and possibilities for treatment.

Dr. Green discussed biomarkers. Though these ‘labs’ are not specific to ASD, per se, this will become a necessary next step to document level of involvement and response to treatments.

A brand new treatment, repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation was presented by Dr. Arun Mukherjee. The jury is still out on this expensive intervention.

Conclusions
One important reason that I return to this meeting, is simply that I feel at home among like-thinking practitioners. Members don’t agree on every subject, but we are respectful and actually enjoy our practices.

In traditional medicine, conferences are basically show-and-tell affairs, where researchers report their data, previously published in medical journals. When doctors think outside the box, practitioners with diverse skills, who are scattered over the globe, discover improved results by networking in this fashion.

Patients, parents, and families can feel confident that progress is being made (slowly), as serious, dedicated doctors continue to try to unravel this modern mystery.

Finally, I am proud to report that, at this meeting, I was awarded Fellowship status in the Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs.

A More Complete Special Needs Practice

Sunday, August 28th, 2016

SherryjpgIn order to achieve optimal outcome in a world of constantly changing complex medical problems, a modern practice needs to embrace the benefits and safety of natural interventions.

Towards that end, The Child Development Center of America welcomes Dr. Sherry Eshraghi of Natural Health Power Works.

Sherry, a mother of a child with autism, has a Doctorate and PhD in Natural Medicine*, and is certified by the Board of the American Alternative Medical Association. She is an expert in autism and associated disorders and uses a natural, holistic approach to improve health and well-being.

This insightful and empathetic professional will complement our services by interviewing and counseling the family as a whole, providing additional health and lifestyle advice.

Sherry writes:
In order to improve the special needs child’s wellness, parents need to be healthy – physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually.

Families with autism spectrum disorders experience certain underlying conditions, such as allergies, depression, diabetes, gastrointestinal and/or autoimmune problems, toxic overload, and more. In natural and preventative medicine, the aim is to reduce the chances of those disorders manifesting themselves by providing specific diets and lifestyle changes. The modalities used are:

  1. • Nutritional counseling for the whole family, such as specific foods to be added, or avoided, in the daily diet. Bio-individual, nutritional assessment, and practical advice can be provided, in order to get our kids to eat what is good for them, taking into account that so many are extremely picky eaters.
  2. • Mind/ Body medicine that addresses, but is not limited to, stresses in the family that arise from caring for a child with special needs.
  3. • Detoxification, orthomolecular therapy, environmental health: when our body’s natural detoxification pathways are impaired, we need to detox in order to restore the body’s natural ability to get rid of toxins by itself. With orthomolecular therapy, we adjust deficiencies and excesses of minerals and vitamins in the body. In addition, we can identify possible toxic environmental exposures.
  4. • Herbal medicine: in natural medicine, you can often avoid harsh chemical drugs with herbal remedies that have less side effects. Plus, they can be used for longer periods of time and heal root causes, instead of simply suppressing symptoms.
  5. • Homeopathy and essential oils: many homeopathy protocols and essential oils can help the body heal itself.

To set up a meeting with Dr. Eshraghi, please call our office at 954 873 8413 or 305 720 9099

Rebecca Sherry Eshraghi, DNM, Ph.D.
www.naturalhealthpowerworks.com

*DISCLAIMER: Natural/ holistic health care is not intended as diagnosis, prescription, treatment or cure for any disease, mental or physical, and is not a substitute for regular medical care. Rebecca Sherry Eshraghi is a certified Doctor of Natural Medicine, not licensed in the state of Florida.

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Brian D. Udell MD
6974 Griffin Road
Davie
FL 33314
Office phone – 954-873-8413
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Email bdumd@childdev.org
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