Posts Tagged ‘GF diet’

Ten Top Toys Not to Get Children Affected with Autism for the Holidays

Thursday, November 23rd, 2017

Maybe this list applies to all modern kids. Especially as regards offspring who are ‘on the spectrum’, our experience and perspective from The Child Development Center can assist gift givers with decisions about whether holiday offerings are consistent with recovering challenged children, as well as making them happy.

What Not To Get Junior for the Holidays

1. Toys that talk to your kid. It’s supposed to be the other way ’round. Imagination through a favorite dolly or stuffed animal, and self talking, represent practice in communication. If someone has to invent a robot that speaks, it should also prompt. Can you imagine that conversation?

2. Stuff that fosters repetitious behaviors. Scrubbing Angry Birds on a digital screen preys upon the fabric of the youngster’s repetitive behaviors. Similarly, devices that enable constant You-Tube video re-viewing foment restricted interests.

3. Most digital gadgets, unfortunately engender those problematic criteria previously listed (#1, #2). i-Things should be reserved for when the parents absolutely cannot attend to the child, rather than becoming a body appendage. And, whenever possible, use a timer to notify the child, “No more.”

4. Presents that are primarily intended for indoor use. There’s already plenty of entertainment throughout the house, and miniaturized for portable use. Encourage healthy outdoor play. That means added work for families of special needs children; but scooters, trampolines, swings and parks – even if your child just watches – are worth a great deal more than another box of Legos.

5. Too many items. While it’s important to promote variety, as witnessed through the oft-uploaded FaceBook album depicting an orgy of holiday presents, that superabundance cannot promote anything but indifference to a truly valued item. As many parents know, just getting a child who is affected with ASD to appreciate any toy is a victory.

6. It’s difficult to completely eliminate preferred playthings. We show our love by gifting pleasurable items. But, those who thoughtfully provide a child’s favorite Disney movie or Star Wars model (when they already have 4 that are similar) might find their special item tucked away for another occasion.

7. Pets that you, the parent, don’t want to take care of. Because, no matter what any other family member claims, the purchaser of the animal is the de facto feeder, caretaker and parent of yet, another ward.

8. Any toy that emits an annoying noise. Frankly, if it makes any noise, the buyer should listen to it, like, 75 times, to experience the real gift. And, ‘friends’ who insist on giving your child such an annoying offering, aren’t really your friends.

9. Even objects that you don’t think can become weaponized may turn into dangerous flying objects. But, those that start out that way are suspect. Sure, that lightsaber looks appealing and fun. But will little princess Leah be bonking brother Jimmy on the head with it?

10. Gadgets with an easily accessible battery compartment. Even when the power is kept in a secure section, Junior may figure it out, especially if reinsertion into a body part is their mission. But, as you are traveling to the ER, you will know that, at least you tried to protect the child.

Conclusion
The message is, think twice before plunking down your precious dollars that could be otherwise spent on valuable therapies, which are necessary to promote healthier development. As with neurotypical kids, the box may be as entertaining (and better play) as the toy inside.

Consider the child’s state of autism. Not unlike many other areas of a special needs child’s life, it’s not fair, but even purchasing gifts requires extra evaluation.

The Perils of Home Treatment for Autism

Sunday, November 5th, 2017

Were it not for a lack of knowledge or, frankly, interest on the part of most of the medical community, parents of children with autism would be happy to relinquish their quest for appropriate treatment.

Too often, I listen to stories about pediatricians who have declared, “Well, I don’t know much about that ‘spectrum’ diagnosis. Let’s wait 3 to 6 months and see what develops.” Or neurologists who, after observing a patient for less than 5 minutes arrive at what they think is an accurate diagnosis, followed by little in the way of explanation, and even less effort to provide relief, other that a ticket to, “find a good therapist.” Then, there is the peanut gallery of mildly interested observers who implicate over-diagnosis and link the epidemic to anti-vaccination conspiracies.

That being said, the families who are left to fend for themselves in this void must navigate a sea of dangerous waters in order to find safe, reliable and effective protocols for children affected with ASD. These are some of the issues that frequently arise for those warrior-parents.

No matter how ‘benign’ the intervention, what works for one child might actually make another child worse. There are many different kinds of autism, including boys (aggressive) vs. girls, early vs. late (language regression), immune (rashes, constantly sick and antibiotics), gastrointestinal (reflux, bowel problems), and genetic variations. Furthermore, at any one point in time, speech apraxia, social isolation, sensory issues, or aggression might define a child’s autism. So, Dr. Google’s therapy du jour may not even apply to the present status of your offspring.

Will Junior actually take a supplement that was suggested on the Internet? Compliance issues are a major challenge among our patients at The Child Development Center. Children are usually very picky eaters, sometimes refusing to chew, or preferring to smell everything, and not likely to ingest another yucky concoction. The ‘best’ fish oil won’t work if your child won’t take it, so a better tasting, less expensive, well-tolerated version may be the better choice.

Costs can spiral out of control. Each affected child may take between 5 to 10 supplements/medications per day, often exceeding $300 per month. And, of course, it is not covered by health insurance. Can you really afford to give another remedy on the advice of a friend-of-a-friend-of-a-person-whose-kid-has-autism?

Complicated, expensive therapies are compelling. Parents who seek experimental, untested, and/or potentially dangerous regimens are not foolish or ignorant, they are frustrated and desperate. For the most part, unless your family has unlimited resources, your money is better spent on proven, conventional behavioral interventions.

Parents may not be aware whether item #2 on the list of supplements is actually amplifying item # 7, or nullifying. For example, notwithstanding manufacturers’ claims, digestive enzymes digest stuff. Probiotics, proteins, etc. work best when they reach their intended destination in the natural state, so some products must be given individually.

Home therapies do not take the place of a thorough medical workup by an experienced practitioner who demonstrates reproducible results. Vitamin D, e.g., is great, but high doses could be harmful. The child’s blood count, liver, kidneys, thyroid, and other metabolic functioning should be documented and followed when a fragile toddler is the recipient of pharmaceuticals of any kind, with potentially serious effects.

Conclusion
Rather than eschewing novel treatments, I am eager to become educated about patients’ reactions – positive and negative – so that my advice applies to each individual child, at a particular point in their recovery, targeted at the therapies that will take the patient to the next level toward independent function.

I have learned useful techniques from naturopathic, holistic, Ayurvedic, and just plain Mom-medicine. Epsom salt baths, attention to nutrition, probiotics, essential oils, and the like, can be quite helpful. However if you are experiencing a 2 year-old who is not making eye contact, a 3 year-old who doesn’t speak, or a 4 year-old who is banging her head, sooner or later you will get the most tangible results from a practitioner who can accurately identify, and treat, such serious challenges.

About regimens and treatments that some might say, “How can it hurt?” the most important lost resource may be time.

Fundraising for Autism Research

Monday, October 23rd, 2017

(Too) many years ago, our Regional Intensive Care Unit had the honor of hosting Audrey Hepburn. At that time, we were knee-deep in cocaine exposed babies, and the entourage stopped at the incubator of a 1 pound infant who was barely visible among the wires and tubes.

I asked the famous actress, 1992 recipient of The Presidential Medal of Freedom, and tireless worker for UNICEF, if she minded that the costs of this single child’s care were expected to exceed $1 million. “Wouldn’t you be able to feed an entire village somewhere?” Her surprising answer was, “There’s enough money for both, if we care to spend it that way.”

Fast forward to a recent NYC fundraiser for Columbia Presbyterian’s Transplant Initiative. I complained to my beautiful and patient wife, Jackie, that autism doesn’t receive the same kind of attention as other medical condtions. Frankly, I was jealous. There is enough money for both, if we choose to spend it that way.

There are presently ~117,000 people requiring an organ transplant of some type. There are over 5 million people with autism. In the past several years, I have attended, and been struck by, similar begrudging feelings at benefits for the Michael J Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Disease. Sure, it’s important to give people a ‘second chance’ at life. But, have the children who are most affected with ASD, and their families, had any real first opportunity at normalcy?

Look, I’m not trying to compare apples to oranges, but it seems that ASD should be appropriately considered as THE childhood epidemic of OUR time. A great deal more is needed by way of funding for useful investigations. I am honored to serve as a Board Member in our local Autism Society of America – Broward County, but research and medical issues are for other institutions.

Increased collaboration among national organizations, including Autism Speaks, Generation Rescue, Talk About Curing Autism Now, Autism Research Institute, The National Autism Association, and local CARD groups, can only strengthen awareness and support.

Autism is stuck in a century-old paradigm of psychological causation. Lately, parents are offered a genetic etiology that leaves them with little hope. Disparate theories and alternate interventions require evidence-based research. That includes adequate vaccine studies – among other ubiquitous toxins – to identify those infants at possible increased risk for untoward consequences.

Acknowledgement of the successes that doctors, such as myself, are experiencing every day, needs to be appropriately studied and documented. It seems that more funding might be directed toward our work, were it not for all of the controversies surrounding an autism label. Unity among the various interested parties to support ‘N of One‘ treatments may help us attain that goal. That way, more toddlers would have access to earlier medical interventions, as well as conventional therapy.

Columbia’s Transplant organization’s motto is “We don’t just practice medicine. We change it.” Practitioners who are at the forefront of effective autism diagnosis and treatment feel that way, as well.

The Real Cause of Autism

Sunday, October 8th, 2017

Recently, these 3 headlines appeared on my iRadar Screens:

Genetics a Cause of Autism in Most Cases: Study
 Korean-American Professor Couple Identify Major Cause of Autism
 Could multivitamin use in pregnancy protect children from autism?

Yet, the research was entitled:

The Heritability of Autism Spectrum Disorder
Mum’s bacteria linked to baby’s behavior
Antenatal nutritional supplementation and autism spectrum disorders in the Stockholm youth cohort: population based cohort study

And, the papers covered the following data:

The examiners mathematically re-analyzed decades-old Swedish registry information that strengthened the association with genetic factors. About the findings the lead author has admitted, “our results do not give any information about specific genes or other direct causes. It only informs us that genes are important…. our study cannot shed any light” on the reason for higher rates.

This was published in Nature, entitled, Maternal gut bacteria promote neurodevelopmental abnormalities in mouse offspring. “The couple found that certain bacteria in the mother’s digestive tract can lead to having an autistic child. Furthermore, they found the exact brain location linked to autistic behaviors, which can be used to find a cure for autism.” Mice are not men.

Using a similar Swedish cohort as the first study, authors reviewed supplementation with multivitamins, iron and folate. They concluded that, “Maternal multivitamin supplementation during pregnancy may be inversely associated with ASD with intellectual disability in offspring.”

Discussion
All of the information first appeared in reputable journals. The stories took a turn through leading health and science magazines, and finally popular media announced theories as if they were dogma. Often, autism research is subject to the ‘telephone game’, resulting in overstated and oversimplified claims masquerading as explanations for complicated medical concepts.

Nevertheless, these investigations represent clues, directions to be pursued, possible new treatments and even prevention. It’s so confusing because they document only baby steps in this scientific puzzle.

Conclusion 
Rather than view these studies as disparate, an alternative perspective could be something like:
If autism is the result of a susceptible individual (genetic study) affected by an environmental stress (mouse study), then utilizing a metabolic intervention (third study) might make sense.

Fathers and Autism

Sunday, June 18th, 2017

The diagnosis of autism seems more difficult for the Dads. We are simply not wired to easily accept deviations from expected norms. For the entire gestation, through the first 15+ months, it’s mostly Mother who is feeding, going to medical visits, and communicating with the new child. So, when development lags and socialization ceases to flow, there is often an extra bit of frustration and disappointment.

This is an ode that I wrote 5 years ago, updated for today’s families who affected by autism:

Warrior Dads. Concerned Dads. Curious, watchful, insightful. Patience.
Sometimes, not so patient.
 
Hard working Dads. Smart… trying anyway. Good husbands… trying anyway.
Sometimes, it works.
 
Miniature cars. Trains. Crayons. Getting them in just the right order.
Spinning. Wheels. Fans. Is that a ‘stim’?
 
Sleep – please. Poop – ?too little ?too much
Toilet training. Communicate!
 
Catch. Football. Soccer.
Maybe, have to wait a little while.
 
Education. Vacation. Camp.
IEPs.
 
Movies. Computers. iPads. iPad Apps.
Youtube. Too much repetition?
 
Wii. xBox. Video games.
On to another (non-preferred) activity. 
 
Decisions. Schools. Therapists. Drugs.
Opinions. Treatment options. Vaccinations. 
 
Doctors. Specialists. Alternative doctors. Naturopaths.
Homeopaths. Chiropractors. Nutritionists. B12 shots.
 
Appointments. Medications. Therapies. Supplements.
Money. Money. Money. More money.
 
Rare Holidays. Vacations. Exercise. Hobbies.
Planning for Restaurants. Shopping. Errands. 
 
Looking for Smiles. Playing with Toys. Chase.
Bouncing. Lots of bouncing.
 
Swimming. Horseback riding. Pet turtle.
Dr. Udell’s fish tank.
 
Finding activities. Yoga for kids. Summer camp scholarships.
Sensory friendly films. Thanks, Autism Society, and other local organizations.
 
Missing Cheeseburgers. Pizza. Mac & cheese. P&J.
Gluten free/ Casein free – Are these French Fries OK?
 
Sisters, brothers, grandparents, in-laws, cousins.
Peers. Precious few friends. 
 
Homework. Practice. Play. 
Worrying. Teaching. Learning.

 It’s all good. You’re a great Dad.
Happy Fathers Day !

© theautismdoctor.com

FDA Warning About Autism Treatment

Sunday, April 16th, 2017

The FDA took the time, this week (4/2017), to sound an alarm about their notion of potentially dangerous off-label ASD treatments, by issuing, “Autism: Beware of Potentially Dangerous Therapies and Products“.

The consumer update begins, “One thing that is important to know about autism up front: There is no cure for autism. So, products or treatments claiming to “cure” autism do not work as claimed. The same is true of many products claiming to “treat” autism or autism-related symptoms. Some may carry significant health risks.” Really?

What are the approved therapies?
According to the document, the antipsychotic drugs Risperdal (risperidone) and Abilify (aripiprazole) are apparently not considered to be that dangerous. Increased death rates are noted in the Physicians Desk Reference, due to the the former medication. The latter pharmaceutical agent contains this caution, “A causal role has been demonstrated with antidepressant use and emergence of suicidality in pediatric patients and young adults…”

Clinically, patients who have taken these drugs have shown markedly increased appetites (leading to obesity), exhibited new tics, demonstrated a ‘zombie-like’ affect, and have been very difficult to dose correctly. Breast enlargement and lactation have been reported with these meds, as well.

What does the FDA consider dangerous?
About metal-removing therapy, “FDA-approved chelating agents are approved for specific uses that do not include the treatment or cure of autism, such as the treatment of lead poisoning and iron overload, and are available by prescription only.” So, this government organization has determined that environmental poisoning is not a cause of autism.

Hyperbaric oxygen treatment has been cleared by the “FDA only for certain medical uses, such as treating decompression sickness suffered by divers.” The document failed to mention that it has been proven effective for non-healing wounds and post-traumatic stress disorder, as well.

Clay baths, and “… various products, including raw camel milk and essential oils. These products have been marketed as a treatment for autism or autism-related symptoms, but have not been proven safe and effective for these advertised uses.” Don’t expect millions of dollars to be poured into research about the effectiveness of these innocuous interventions.

If you wish to utilize essential oils,
do so at your own peril !

Discussion
The medical literature continues to question the usefulness of Abilify or Risperdal for the treatment of signs and symptoms of ASD. But it is perfectly clear that, even the supporting literature never makes any statement about apraxic children. Stopping the banging doesn’t produce speech. Plus, socialization only improves to the extent that these ‘safe’ drugs reduce unusual behaviors or decrease aggression.

Moreover, the body systems that are in need of repair and optimization do not get addressed – indeed, are even masked – by such a pharmacological bandaid, which leads to further complications. Often, this makes the child with increased resistance to pain even more stuck with their autistic behaviors. Difficulties in the gastrointestinal, immune, and nervous systems, go unrecognized. Mitochondrial functioning is affected, compounding metabolic challenges in this vicious cycle.

Parents seek ‘risky’ therapies because of the inadequacies of the medical profession in just about every aspect of autism diagnosis, prevention, treatment and care. Rather than elevating autism anxiety over the dangers of mostly mild, possibly helpful, but unproven interventions, we would be better served by an honest evaluation about the overuse of the ‘on-label’ products. This is especially true in disadvantaged populations. When functional medicine doctors, such as myself, utilize these drugs, it is usually as a last resort, after explaining risks/benefits to parents, with close follow-up of the patients’ condition.

Conclusion
TV commercials tout incredibly risky medications, for diseases that range from restless leg syndrome to cancer. “Ask your doctor,” we are told, “if this is a good drug for you!” Then, a list of very scary side effects is enumerated. Well, you could just ‘ask your doctor’ if camel milk will cause seizures or death.

Parents of children with developmental challenges have plenty of work to do, just getting through each day. This useless memorandum will, most probably, simply be ignored. For those who feel that the consumer update was produced to pursue some financial and/or political motivation, and/or is another example of bureaucratic waste, you may feel compelled to address the (ir)responsible organization (click here).

ADHD Medication Guide

Sunday, January 8th, 2017

As the academic season becomes more challenging, The Child Development Center is often asked about the various pharmaceutical preparations that are suggested by doctors, behavioral and academic personnel. Specific medicines are frequently prescribed for symptoms that include poor focus and attention, hyperactivity, distractibility, fidgeting, not listening, a short fuse, and lack of self control.

As parents ponder this important decision, here is a useful list to improve understanding and address frequent concerns, in decreasing order of potency and side effects:

Prescription
Methamphetamines

Names: AdderallDesoxynAdzenysDianavelEvekeo, Dexedrine, ProCentra, Zenzeti
Plus Lisdexamphetamine (Vyvanse)

Class – Stimulant, Amphetamine
Comment: These were the first generation of stimulants. They are the most addictive, bring about appetite suppression (‘diet’ pills), create sleep disturbance and growth suppression. Families should consider using these when less potent preparations fail.

Methyphenidates
Names: Methylin, Methylphenidate, Ritalin, Concerta, Daytrona, Quillivant, Quillichew, Aptensio
Plus Dexmethyphenidate (Focalin)

Class –  Psychostimulant, Methylphenidate derivates
Comment: There are actually only two choices in this category, as well. The theory of using stimulant medications for ADHD is that affected patients experience a paradoxical reaction to the invigorating effects that neurotypical individuals would sense.

From a chemical standpoint, all of these names pare down to just 4 compounds. They share these common features:
DEA – Class Rx Schedule 2. Therefore, your doctor will be very careful about documentation and prescription handling, and will require followup visits.
The choices here are usually driven by the formulation; available as a liquid, chewable, patch, pill, or capsule configurations.
Plus, manufacturers offer a myriad of confusing dosage options; from 1, to multiples of 5, to multiples of 10, to multiples of 18 milligrams.
When the medications start to wear off, there is often an increase in negative behaviors. For this reason, dosage and frequency are crucial to produce the most effective amelioration of symptoms.
However, insurance companies have become very restrictive in the preparations that they will cover, and out-of-pocket costs are high. When trying to achieve the optimal medication schedule, such stipulations complicate making the best clinical decisions.
The medical risks of any of these preparations include a myriad of cardiac maladies. The AAP no longer recommends a pediatric cardiology evaluation. This is not a good idea, and once a patient demonstrates that they will continue to take these prescriptions, The Child Development Center refers to the appropriate specialist.

Atomoxitine
Names: Strattera
Class – Non-stimulant
DEA Class – Rx
Comment – Frequently vaunted as THE ‘non-stimulant ADHD medication’. Besides an increased risk of suicidal ideation, significant growth inhibition and sudden death, in my experience, it has never been a useful choice. Really, don’t bother with this remedy.

Phosphatidylserine
Names: Vayarin, PS 100
Class – Non-stimulant
DEA Class – Medical food
Comment – The active ingredient is a natural fat that is supposed to aid cell-to-cell communication in the brain. The name brand contains an omega 3 oil, and requires a prescription. The over-the-counter product might be preferable if the patient is allergic to fish or soy.

Non-Prescription Stimulants
Despite a 2004 study that demonstrated that nicotine was equivalent to methylphenidate in ADHD symptom reduction, the practice has not become popular due to the inability to control the patch dosage and skin discomfort. However, the effects of caffeine may provide a reasonable alternative. At The Child Development Center, pure caffeine is chosen over coffee, tea or other products that contain a multitude of other ingredients, in order to objectively assess the results of administration.

Conclusions
1. The most important factor in deciding on treatment is a precise diagnosis, which requires a thorough history, physical examination, and appropriate laboratory testing. A doctor cannot simply look at your child and declare that they have ADHD.

2. Medication administration continues to be offered to younger and younger children. Deferring pharmaceutical intervention can mitigate against the most significant side effects.

3. When stimulants are initiated, it is not unusual for parents to observe that, either the med doesn’t work quickly as expected, or that the child acts like a ‘zombie’, or that the child exhibits even more hyperactive behaviors.

4. Although this guide is presented in order of medicinal ‘strength’, whether a product works depends on a myriad of factors. Preparations that are lower on the list may be far superior to more potent formulas. Plus, the mere observation that the child is sitting still does not necessarily reflect that real learning is taking place.

5. Research continues to demonstrate that appropriate behavioral therapy is a useful and effective treatment.

Curcumin for Autism and ADHD

Sunday, November 27th, 2016
Turmeric plant

Turmeric plant

Over the past year, The Child Development Center has been successfully utilizing a natural supplement (Enhansa®) that appears to be improving the health of our patients’ gastrointestinal system, body and mind.

The turmeric plant and its product, curcumin, have been the subject of a number of media reports, lately. How can the preparation help patients with ADHD and ASD?

Turmeric subsoil stems>powder>curcumin molecule

Turmeric subsoil stems>powder>curcumin molecule

What it is
Turmeric is part of the ginger family, mostly known for its role as the main spice in curry. Curcuminoid compounds are utilized to treat a variety of medical conditions; including auto-immunity in the blood, rashes in the skin, problems with the gut, parasites within the body, and disorders of the liver, kidney, and brain.

Why it works
Many doctors ask, “How can one chemical help so many diverse conditions?”
An emerging theme in the practice of modern medicine is the ability of an affected body part to heal itself. Such a belief has been central to other therapeutic sciences for a long time. In that paradigm, natural substances that promote repair are at least as important as medicines that attack a presumed cause.

Turmeric contains curcumin, which possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Given that the compound successfully accomplishes those tasks, improvements in the efficiency and function of any organ throughout the body should be understandable.

How it is administered
Various preparations have been marketed as the ‘best’ formulation; including pills, crushed, with/without taste, and offerings from numerous manufacturers. Powder with black pepper is popular.

Similar to most medications, it is best to go ‘low and slow’. As the patient displays individual tolerance to a given pattern, the dose and/or frequency can be adjusted.

Effects
We have received lots of emails describing a variety of results – mostly positive, some negative, all instructive:
I have noticed great improvements in cognition and language with your suggested supplement. She seems a little more irritable, but the the gains are so good.
-The curcumin has been amazing. Improved language and cognition. Significant improvements.
-He felt warm for two days, but never registered a fever. He is doing amazing in school! He is now sitting with the other kids and doing his seat work. According to the school staff, they have witnessed attempts to talk and word approximations. The ABA therapist visited him at school yesterday, and reported the same. She is extremely pleased with his progress, and we are as well. I’m going to send you a picture.
-Our child reacted well to the turmeric and LDN compound. At first we thought he had a reaction to it, but he was getting sick. We have continued on the path and he seems to be reacting nicely. He is babbling much more and mood has improved…
-This supplement has been amazing so far at 75 mg bid. Her focus and sustained attention and receptive language are much improved and all her therapists across the board have noticed!
-It has been amazing. Improved language and cognition. Significant improvements.

Side Effects
I also wanted to ask, his poop has turned yellowish, it used to be dark brown. Is this normal with the supplements?
Changes in the color of urine and stool are due to the intense yellow color.
Our child was on the product for two days and an intense rash developed around his eyes! I stopped giving it, and it is slowly getting better.
Rashes are the most common side effect, so far. Reducing the dose often improves the problem, but close medical supervision is paramount.

Conclusion
As with all medical interventions, your child should be under the care of an experienced practitioner who can make specific recommendations. It is impossible to test all brands. Patients and problems are so diverse that, generally, doctors stick with the supplements with which we become most familiar.

When given to the appropriate population, with close followup of the clinical course, adding curcumin to the treatment protocol appears safe, and can provide significant improvement for patients with ASD.

cumin

Cumin plant, powder, seeds

By the way
Curcumin is not cumin, which is a different spice that is derived from seeds. Both products are used in curry. They share many similar flavoring and medicinal properties.

 

Gut Anxiety?

Sunday, November 20th, 2016

Sherryjpg

Dr. Sherry Eshraghi, of Natural Health Power Works has been consulting with families at The Child Development Center of America, where she provides knowledgeable advice about nutrition and naturopathic intervention.

This week (11/16), Dr. Sherry writes:

If you have ever had a panic attack, you are well aware of how bad it feels. Many sufferers have it on a regular basis, others have experienced only occasional short periods of these episodes.

Often, the feeling comes out of the blue; even in a relaxed state, while reading a book, watching a movie, sitting in a park…
Suddenly you start feeling light-headed, dizzy, your pulse starts racing and you feel like you are going to have a heart attack. You feel like you can’t catch your breath and then the panic sets in, mostly the feeling that you are going to die.

The reaction can be so overwhelming that you phone for an ambulance, or go to the emergency room. After a thorough check-up, you may be informed that you are fully healthy and nothing is wrong. If you are given an accurate diagnosis – that you’ve had a panic attack – you feel dumbfounded and incredulous. When you start having regular anxiety spells, you may become concerned that something is wrong with you mentally. Perhaps you start taking medications that might, or might not, work.

But don’t worry…you are not crazy! Although prolonged stress can trigger anxiety attacks, there are other factors that play a role but are often overlooked. Generally, people do not pay attention to the earliest signs – feeling gassy, belching, passing gas, or that their bowel habit has changed.

serotonin-emoji-2You have probably heard about the fascinating research demonstrating that there is a gut-brain connection. Indeed, the gut is often referred to as our ‘second brain’. In fact, a very important neurotransmitter – serotonin – is primarily produced in the abdomen. A deficiency in the chemical can cause anxiety, poor sleep, inability to focus, agitation and mood swings, depression, and more.

What leads to a deficiency in serotonin?
Prolonged stress, leaky gut, malabsorption, inadequate nutrient dense foods, food allergies and lack of beneficial gut bacteria are all culprits. Recent studies show that gut bacteria are key components in the production of serotonin.

What can you do to prevent and minimize the number of anxiety attacks?
Heal your gastrointestinal system! Get a food allergy test, replenish the gut with beneficial bacteria, reduce sugar and processed foods, adopt an anti-inflammatory diet, exercise regularly and learn to manage your stress early on.

Remember, you’re not out of your mind…
It’s all in your gut!

Sources:
Emeran A. Mayer, Rob Knight, Sarkis K. Mazmanian, et al., “Gut Microbes and the Brain: Paradigm Shift in Neuroscience”, Journal of Neuroscience, 2014
Jessica M. Yano, Kristie Yu, et al, “Indigenous Bacteria from the Gut Microbiota Regulate Host Serotonin Biosynthesis”, Cell, 2015

Getting Children to Take Their Supplements & Medications

Sunday, October 30th, 2016

take-medA common feature among children who suffer from sensory processing issues is their reluctance to take the very preparations that would help attenuate such disturbances, and the will to get their way.

Here are some tips and observations, gathered over the years at the Child Development Center of America, that may be of some use as a parent attempts to cajole junior into ‘taking his medicine.’

B-twelve lollipops simply don’t cut it. There are various strategies for those who won’t take subcutaneously administered methyl-B12, from a middle-of-the-night sneak attack, to an early morning assault. Expensive topical anesthetic agents are rarely required or helpful. Squeamish parents may hire a nurse, or ask a friend or relative. In school, we practiced on fruit. Occasionally, there have been parents who take their child to the doctor, until they become more comfortable.

Dermal creams can be an excellent alternative. Naltrexone administered in this manner may alleviate sensory issues and enable more generalized compliance. Magnesium, epsom salt baths and other agents may be quite helpful. On the other hand, every supplement does not work in a cream form, due to its composition and absorption.
This is a propitious time to mention the use of essential oils. Calming to the mind and body, these may be just the ticket for getting a mildly oppositional youngster to comply.

Many families mix preparations with preferred liquids and foods. Should a parent risk a small volume of casein or other forbidden fare? Frankly, occasionally, that may be the better option. On the other hand, some children may then refuse taking even that ONE liquid that they consider acceptable. Starting with very low doses of the offending agent may work.
We recommend oil-based products for the like; e.g. almond butter or mustard, if the supplement comes in that form. Applesauce is good for gloppy goodies.

Some children may respond to mechanical strategies, such as practicing with candy, drinking fluid first, or placing the pill in just the right part of the tongue. Another strategy involves the use of a pill swallowing cup. A non-scientific review of our experience at The Center has not found those of any real value. They look scary, and we couldn’t give them away.

Ask the occupational, behavioral or physical therapist to assist in the learning process. To the extent that the professional recognizes – and believes in – the accompanying improvements for their job, they should embrace their role in assisting the process. In a similar vein, alternative techniques practiced by chiropractors and reflexologists might include their additional expertise in helping a child acquire this skill.

Social stories may be a great aid for certain children. An artistic parent may even be able to create one (digital or analog) with your child’s pictures and voices, enabling the child to view the process and diminish anxiety. The propensity for affected children to perseverate on youtube videos might provide an opportunity to encourage an understanding and acceptance of this technique.

Most parents have already exhausted the role of bribery. Often, families have found this strategy of limited benefit after a lifelong pursuit of compliance in one or another less-daunting behaviors. From this perspective, and towards this end, this could be utilized as one of the ONLY times that your child gets the iThing.

Make sure that the child is on the most healthful diet. For parents who believe that the foods their children eat have little to affect on behavior, you should at least give a try. The end point might be as ‘simple’ as your child’s understanding and compliance.

For certain preparations, there is always the rectal route. The child may accept that oral is preferable, if they don’t bite and run for the hills (and lock the door).
Sometimes this one can backfire – literally.

Develop the right attitude. With autism, the senses of smell, taste and texture are involved. Oral-motor functioning is weak. There are medical reasons for patient refusal. One inconsequential substance may be misperceived as awful, however another foul-smelling product may not even be noticed. Plus, some therapeutic protocols may increase aggressive behaviors for brief periods. For most children, reasoning is of little value. “Because mommy says so!”

Truth be told, only ~1% refuse just about everything. Such children won’t be told, taught, or tricked. The parent has to decide how important the supplement, how likely it is to work, and weigh the consequences of continued non-compliance. But, getting a child to accept only one or two of these preparations may jump start a pathway to increased compliance in other endeavors, as well.

I never had a juvenile arthritis patient, or child with diabetes or other significant malady, where the parent didn’t bite the bullet and do whatever is necessary. To the extent that the practitioner and parent believes in results, the deed will be done.

As always, knowledgeable and experienced parents are invited to offer their stellar suggestions…

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Brian D. Udell MD
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Davie
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Email bdumd@childdev.org
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