Ten Top Toys Not to Get Children Affected with Autism for the Holidays

Maybe this list applies to all modern kids. Especially as regards offspring who are ‘on the spectrum’, our experience and perspective from The Child Development Center can assist gift givers with decisions about whether holiday offerings are consistent with recovering challenged children, as well as making them happy.

What Not To Get Junior for the Holidays

1. Toys that talk to your kid. It’s supposed to be the other way ’round. Imagination through a favorite dolly or stuffed animal, and self talking, represent practice in communication. If someone has to invent a robot that speaks, it should also prompt. Can you imagine that conversation?

2. Stuff that fosters repetitious behaviors. Scrubbing Angry Birds on a digital screen preys upon the fabric of the youngster’s repetitive behaviors. Similarly, devices that enable constant You-Tube video re-viewing foment restricted interests.

3. Most digital gadgets, unfortunately engender those problematic criteria previously listed (#1, #2). i-Things should be reserved for when the parents absolutely cannot attend to the child, rather than becoming a body appendage. And, whenever possible, use a timer to notify the child, “No more.”

4. Presents that are primarily intended for indoor use. There’s already plenty of entertainment throughout the house, and miniaturized for portable use. Encourage healthy outdoor play. That means added work for families of special needs children; but scooters, trampolines, swings and parks – even if your child just watches – are worth a great deal more than another box of Legos.

5. Too many items. While it’s important to promote variety, as witnessed through the oft-uploaded FaceBook album depicting an orgy of holiday presents, that superabundance cannot promote anything but indifference to a truly valued item. As many parents know, just getting a child who is affected with ASD to appreciate any toy is a victory.

6. It’s difficult to completely eliminate preferred playthings. We show our love by gifting pleasurable items. But, those who thoughtfully provide a child’s favorite Disney movie or Star Wars model (when they already have 4 that are similar) might find their special item tucked away for another occasion.

7. Pets that you, the parent, don’t want to take care of. Because, no matter what any other family member claims, the purchaser of the animal is the de facto feeder, caretaker and parent of yet, another ward.

8. Any toy that emits an annoying noise. Frankly, if it makes any noise, the buyer should listen to it, like, 75 times, to experience the real gift. And, ‘friends’ who insist on giving your child such an annoying offering, aren’t really your friends.

9. Even objects that you don’t think can become weaponized may turn into dangerous flying objects. But, those that start out that way are suspect. Sure, that lightsaber looks appealing and fun. But will little princess Leah be bonking brother Jimmy on the head with it?

10. Gadgets with an easily accessible battery compartment. Even when the power is kept in a secure section, Junior may figure it out, especially if reinsertion into a body part is their mission. But, as you are traveling to the ER, you will know that, at least you tried to protect the child.

Conclusion
The message is, think twice before plunking down your precious dollars that could be otherwise spent on valuable therapies, which are necessary to promote healthier development. As with neurotypical kids, the box may be as entertaining (and better play) as the toy inside.

Consider the child’s state of autism. Not unlike many other areas of a special needs child’s life, it’s not fair, but even purchasing gifts requires extra evaluation.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Categories Archives Links Contact Us

Brian D. Udell MD
6974 Griffin Road
Davie
FL 33314
Office phone – 954-873-8413
Fax – 954-792-2424

Email bdumd@childdev.org
Copyright © TheAutismDoctor.com 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
All Rights Reserved