Archive for the ‘Holidays & Vacations’ Category

Fathers and Autism

Sunday, June 18th, 2017

The diagnosis of autism seems more difficult for the Dads. We are simply not wired to easily accept deviations from expected norms. For the entire gestation, through the first 15+ months, it’s mostly Mother who is feeding, going to medical visits, and communicating with the new child. So, when development lags and socialization ceases to flow, there is often an extra bit of frustration and disappointment.

This is an ode that I wrote 5 years ago, updated for today’s families who affected by autism:

Warrior Dads. Concerned Dads. Curious, watchful, insightful. Patience.
Sometimes, not so patient.
 
Hard working Dads. Smart… trying anyway. Good husbands… trying anyway.
Sometimes, it works.
 
Miniature cars. Trains. Crayons. Getting them in just the right order.
Spinning. Wheels. Fans. Is that a ‘stim’?
 
Sleep – please. Poop – ?too little ?too much
Toilet training. Communicate!
 
Catch. Football. Soccer.
Maybe, have to wait a little while.
 
Education. Vacation. Camp.
IEPs.
 
Movies. Computers. iPads. iPad Apps.
Youtube. Too much repetition?
 
Wii. xBox. Video games.
On to another (non-preferred) activity. 
 
Decisions. Schools. Therapists. Drugs.
Opinions. Treatment options. Vaccinations. 
 
Doctors. Specialists. Alternative doctors. Naturopaths.
Homeopaths. Chiropractors. Nutritionists. B12 shots.
 
Appointments. Medications. Therapies. Supplements.
Money. Money. Money. More money.
 
Rare Holidays. Vacations. Exercise. Hobbies.
Planning for Restaurants. Shopping. Errands. 
 
Looking for Smiles. Playing with Toys. Chase.
Bouncing. Lots of bouncing.
 
Swimming. Horseback riding. Pet turtle.
Dr. Udell’s fish tank.
 
Finding activities. Yoga for kids. Summer camp scholarships.
Sensory friendly films. Thanks, Autism Society, and other local organizations.
 
Missing Cheeseburgers. Pizza. Mac & cheese. P&J.
Gluten free/ Casein free – Are these French Fries OK?
 
Sisters, brothers, grandparents, in-laws, cousins.
Peers. Precious few friends. 
 
Homework. Practice. Play. 
Worrying. Teaching. Learning.

 It’s all good. You’re a great Dad.
Happy Fathers Day !

© theautismdoctor.com

Thanks, Moms, for Your Special Attention

Sunday, May 14th, 2017

There are some great fathers out there, to be sure. Dads, don’t get me wrong, I’ll give you guys your due in June. I’m not judging and I have no idea how I might have done with such a challenging journey as raising an autistic child. I am simply reporting my observation that, by far, the majority of amazing caretakers out there are the mothers.

Dr. Martha Herbert has often begun her scientific presentations with a story about a friend whose adult child awoke from anesthesia and spent hours speaking normally with her mom. The daughter knew how difficult of a child she was and how much hard work her mother had done to get her to this point. After falling back to sleep and re-awakening, the daughter again exhibited her autistic personality. Dr. Herbert uses this example (plus more genuine scientific evidence) to teach that there seems to be a reversibility to ASD, and we have yet to even look at the problem in the right manner (as a whole body disorder). Her message is for moms to keep trying, as will SHE, until there is an answer.

Jenny McCarthy’s “mother warrior” credo has helped recover many children, I am certain of that. Her message has been that the general public cannot necessarily trust conventional medical thinking about the diagnosis, etiology, treatment, and prognosis for this epidemic. You can’t blame her for seeking answers for her son and all of the other children with autism.

So, in many of my posts, I write about planning, medication, special diets, supplements, and therapies. For the moms out there, that’s preaching to the choir. I’m only enumerating such chores as I detail the work that every ASD patient requires. I have learned most of my art – about toilet training, time management, addressing stims, GF/CF, cluster classes, IEPs, sensory conditioning and much much, more – from the insightful and relentless mothers who are determined to help their child recover.

Thank you. Thank you all for letting me examine and help care for your children. It has been one of the best experiences that I have ever had in my professional life.

The only piece of advice that I’ll offer in this post is this, take some time out for yourself and your spouse. I said “some”, ’cause I know that it is sometimes impossible. But, it needs to be more than “none”. The number of intact families in this practice is even lower than the national average.

At this time of year, mothers seek advice about how to continue administering their children’s pharmaceutical protocol, in camp or on vacation. The diet, vitamins, and medications that require prescriptions – all in order to get on a plane. Then, there is the plane! I’m not quite sure how families are able to get anywhere with all of the work that is required.

Mothers are special. Mother’s Day is certainly a deserved holiday.
Moms of Autistic Kids?
Lucky children.

Speech Apraxia and Autism Misbehavior

Sunday, May 7th, 2017

This week (May ’17), Penn State researchers claimed to have disproven a generally-accepted premise with an article is entitled, Tantrums are Not Associated with Speech or Language Deficits in Preschool Children with Autism.

The Study
The authors retrieved information from a previous data collection, which was not intended for this purpose, and reviewed 240 cases. Children, who were 15 to 71 months old, “… whose mental age was sufficient for verbal communication but who lacked speech did not have more tantrums than children with adequate speech. In fact, children with an expressive language age at or above 24 months had more tantrums than children whose speech skills were below 24 months.

Their conclusion is the exact opposite of what we all suspect. “Our findings and those of others do not support the belief that preschool children with autism have tantrums because they cannot speak or because their speech is difficult to understand.”

Discussion
In autism, THE toughest sign to successfully ameliorate is a patient’s inability to produce spoken language. Indeed, professionals who have chosen this undertaking will attest to significant challenges. Proven medical protocols are few, though anecdotal ones abound.

The second most difficult expression of ASD is immature conduct, including tantrums. Behavioral intervention is the proven successful treatment. Conventional medical protocols invoke potent pharmaceuticals with significant side effects and variable results, so alternative strategies have emerged.

For years, parents and professionals, alike, have accepted a direct relationship between these two disturbing symptoms. There appears to be general agreement that, as children get older and smarter, they are increasingly frustrated by their failure to adequately communicate. There is a 30-year body of literature that supports this position.

Why were the findings of this paper
so counterintuitive?

This perspective is supported by substantial research, as well. The authors argue, “The reason may in part be because of the effectiveness of interventions… which use behavioral techniques to teach children to use words, and not inappropriate behaviors, to communicate.”

In other words, if language improves through successful therapy, a child may still have tantrums if that issue is not addressed, per se, as well. Those patients who do not get adequate socialization skills continue to resort to outbursts, in order to get needs met.

The publication lacks several key elements. ‘Tantrum’ is used as an outcome measure, begging the question of whether more serious issues, such as self-injury or aggression, were considered in the definition. Medication usage was not documented. Perhaps, patients who were most disruptive received more drugs without relief or even negative side effects? Additional medical issues were, likewise, omitted from the data. In the diverse ASD population, this could be a highly significant variable.

Conclusion
The outcome of this paper could have been that children who have better language skills are more likely to have tantrums! The authors were careful to leave that out. Plus, the closing sentence includes, “Our findings do not diminish the importance of evidence-based interventions…”

If, as the paper asserts, the reason for fewer tantrums was an individual’s type of intervention, then the conclusion seems to be that Functional Communication Therapy is useful for tantrums due to autism.

Or, one might deduce that each individual diagnosed with ASD is so different in their physical and mental state, that there is no certainty, at this time, to explain why this group showed a null relationship.

Is it true? Could tantrums, “… in large part be intrinsic to autism and not driven by developmental processes, such as language.” Is it important? Why? Perhaps, such insight could provide a more effective and efficient window of treatment options. Furthermore, there is general agreement that traditional measures can play an important role in remediation.

Getting a Special Needs Break

Monday, April 24th, 2017

Parents of children with developmental disabilities rarely get a break. Sometimes, it is not even possible to have a child watched for a couple of hours while shopping, taking care of your own health, seeing to the needs of other children, or running household errands.

As a practitioner who cares for patients with special needs, I often find myself with no one to care for my practice, when I’m attending a meeting or taking a rare vacation. The wedding of a dear friend in California recently highlighted this issue. Patients still get fevers, rashes, diarrhea and even seizures. Medications may not be working, or causing untoward side effects. Parents from all over continue to experience the frustration of dealing with the autism epidemic as it emerges in their part of the world.

Acute illness can be addressed locally by pediatricians, hospital emergency rooms, or urgent care centers. The main difficulty is that doctors are not trained in special needs care. Although they may be able to correctly diagnose and treat an ear infection, they are usually way too quick to prescribe antibiotics or fail to perform appropriate laboratory testing. With the increasing popularity of group practices, continuity of care is compromised. Often, children go from one doctor (or nurse practitioner) to another, further increasing confusion, and rarely getting to the underlying problem(s).

The Child Development Center of America
It would not be possible to keep up with all of the patients’ problems if it were not for a digital connection and web communication. Many mornings start with a picture of poop or an unusual skin lesion. It may not be as precise as touching and feeling the actual patient, but I have been able to handle a multitude of problems because of the Internet.

More importantly, I enjoy a great staff, led by our practice administrator Karen Vossen, herself the parent of two children with a diversity of medical problems, including autism. Ashly, at the front desk, speaks fluent Spanish, which is a must in such a diverse South Florida population. Likewise, Isabella, who interacts with the children, speaks additional foreign languages. Lisa, who handles the books (among her other duties), has four boys, including one who is doing great with his ASD. Leilani, our newest member, has experience with autistic children and hopes to become a speech therapist.

Most assuredly, I have a great family who understands my life’s passion. I am encouraged by my beautiful and patient wife, Jacqueline. She is the person who mused me into this amazing journey and constantly reminds me that my physical and mental health matter, as well.

Useful Strategies
First, in times of extreme stress and exhaustion, take a long, deep breath and congratulate yourselves on the ability to deal with so much constant pressure. We are all doing the best that we can for the children. Let’s not forget that maintaining our own wellbeing is paramount to assisting others.

Recharging the batteries by exercising, personal pampering, date nights and hobbies that take our focus elsewhere, even if only for a brief period, is a necessity.

Depending on the degree of a family member’s difficulties, respite care may be essential. In some states, the National Respite Network may be able to provide some necessary assistance.

The Autism Society and local chapters may provide a great source of support. Joining such networks can be especially helpful for parents of newly diagnosed children, letting families know that they are not alone in this journey. Local organizations, such as your state’s Developmental Disabilities Council or Family Services Agency (Broward 211 in Florida, e.g.), may be a useful choice.

Finally, try to find a good Special Needs practitioner and stay away from Dr. Google.

Conclusion
Although it’s not exactly the same problem, the challenge of finding help in this age of an increasing number of developmentally demanding children, complicated by a paucity of available resources, is shared by parents and professionals, alike.

FDA Warning About Autism Treatment

Sunday, April 16th, 2017

The FDA took the time, this week (4/2017), to sound an alarm about their notion of potentially dangerous off-label ASD treatments, by issuing, “Autism: Beware of Potentially Dangerous Therapies and Products“.

The consumer update begins, “One thing that is important to know about autism up front: There is no cure for autism. So, products or treatments claiming to “cure” autism do not work as claimed. The same is true of many products claiming to “treat” autism or autism-related symptoms. Some may carry significant health risks.” Really?

What are the approved therapies?
According to the document, the antipsychotic drugs Risperdal (risperidone) and Abilify (aripiprazole) are apparently not considered to be that dangerous. Increased death rates are noted in the Physicians Desk Reference, due to the the former medication. The latter pharmaceutical agent contains this caution, “A causal role has been demonstrated with antidepressant use and emergence of suicidality in pediatric patients and young adults…”

Clinically, patients who have taken these drugs have shown markedly increased appetites (leading to obesity), exhibited new tics, demonstrated a ‘zombie-like’ affect, and have been very difficult to dose correctly. Breast enlargement and lactation have been reported with these meds, as well.

What does the FDA consider dangerous?
About metal-removing therapy, “FDA-approved chelating agents are approved for specific uses that do not include the treatment or cure of autism, such as the treatment of lead poisoning and iron overload, and are available by prescription only.” So, this government organization has determined that environmental poisoning is not a cause of autism.

Hyperbaric oxygen treatment has been cleared by the “FDA only for certain medical uses, such as treating decompression sickness suffered by divers.” The document failed to mention that it has been proven effective for non-healing wounds and post-traumatic stress disorder, as well.

Clay baths, and “… various products, including raw camel milk and essential oils. These products have been marketed as a treatment for autism or autism-related symptoms, but have not been proven safe and effective for these advertised uses.” Don’t expect millions of dollars to be poured into research about the effectiveness of these innocuous interventions.

If you wish to utilize essential oils,
do so at your own peril !

Discussion
The medical literature continues to question the usefulness of Abilify or Risperdal for the treatment of signs and symptoms of ASD. But it is perfectly clear that, even the supporting literature never makes any statement about apraxic children. Stopping the banging doesn’t produce speech. Plus, socialization only improves to the extent that these ‘safe’ drugs reduce unusual behaviors or decrease aggression.

Moreover, the body systems that are in need of repair and optimization do not get addressed – indeed, are even masked – by such a pharmacological bandaid, which leads to further complications. Often, this makes the child with increased resistance to pain even more stuck with their autistic behaviors. Difficulties in the gastrointestinal, immune, and nervous systems, go unrecognized. Mitochondrial functioning is affected, compounding metabolic challenges in this vicious cycle.

Parents seek ‘risky’ therapies because of the inadequacies of the medical profession in just about every aspect of autism diagnosis, prevention, treatment and care. Rather than elevating autism anxiety over the dangers of mostly mild, possibly helpful, but unproven interventions, we would be better served by an honest evaluation about the overuse of the ‘on-label’ products. This is especially true in disadvantaged populations. When functional medicine doctors, such as myself, utilize these drugs, it is usually as a last resort, after explaining risks/benefits to parents, with close follow-up of the patients’ condition.

Conclusion
TV commercials tout incredibly risky medications, for diseases that range from restless leg syndrome to cancer. “Ask your doctor,” we are told, “if this is a good drug for you!” Then, a list of very scary side effects is enumerated. Well, you could just ‘ask your doctor’ if camel milk will cause seizures or death.

Parents of children with developmental challenges have plenty of work to do, just getting through each day. This useless memorandum will, most probably, simply be ignored. For those who feel that the consumer update was produced to pursue some financial and/or political motivation, and/or is another example of bureaucratic waste, you may feel compelled to address the (ir)responsible organization (click here).

Home Schooling Children with Autism Issues

Monday, September 5th, 2016

Home schoolADHD, aggression, bullying and being bullied, meltdowns, oppositional, auditory, visual and other Sensory Processing Disorders, are among the many challenges of modern school-aged children who are recovering from the conditions that are categorized under Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Individualized educational plans have gone a long way toward providing an increasing number of affected youngsters with a more appropriate academic environment. Yet, there remain numerous educational situations in which young children face significant obstacles.

Considering such challenges, an increasing number of families have chosen to home school their neuro-diverse offspring. Here is some of the valuable information that parents have provided about the decision to undertake such a situation.

What are the common characteristics of families who choose to home school?
The most disruptive children require additional medication, and/or one-on-one supervision. Sometimes, only a family member or therapist can achieve control, performed at home (or equivalent).

Families live in locations where there is an serious shortage of appropriately trained personnel.

The IEP and associated adjudication of services do not appear adequate to meet their child’s need. This could involve a lack of classrooms with ‘higher’ functioning individuals, or not enough services for those who have more troubling signs and symptoms of autism.

Parents concerned that, inattention, lack of focus, and hyperactivity in the neurotypical academic environment – by their own child and others – will likely negatively affect performance, grades, and self esteem. Indeed, the psychological profile scores are usually ‘all over the place’, indicating that processing is affected, not IQ.

Sometimes, the choice is influenced by the reluctance to administer stimulant and/or anti-anxiety medication, especially in the youngest students.

What are the biggest challenges?
Relationships with affected children, neurotypical siblings, and blending teaching with family activities, takes a quantum leap in patience, time and effort.

The discipline to prepare lessons and implement the required syllabus is a full-time job.

The outcome of all of this work requires evaluation to assess whether avoiding a traditional program is the preferable course. Has it been worth it?

Caretakers need to determine the best means to ensure exposure to others, and additional ways to foster socialization.

Ultimately, there needs to be a decision if/when to merge the children into a traditional academic environment.

Conclusion
Home schooling enables the ‘teacher’ to maximize learning by individualizing. Caretakers notice when affected children are ‘present’, or allow the necessary time to ‘get the jitters out’. If a youngster is able to avoid taking a test on a particularly squirrelly day, their score will probably be higher. Self esteem improves and anxiety abates.

For those under the age of 6, any suggestion that medication will ‘improve the academic situation’ should be carefully scrutinized. When there is a stay-at-home-parent, additional help, and other resources, home schooling may be the better option, especially for those who are most affected with ASD.

Though it’s not for every parent, or child, this path does provide some families with the most optimal opportunity to guide their offspring to their highest potential.

A More Complete Special Needs Practice

Sunday, August 28th, 2016

SherryjpgIn order to achieve optimal outcome in a world of constantly changing complex medical problems, a modern practice needs to embrace the benefits and safety of natural interventions.

Towards that end, The Child Development Center of America welcomes Dr. Sherry Eshraghi of Natural Health Power Works.

Sherry, a mother of a child with autism, has a Doctorate and PhD in Natural Medicine*, and is certified by the Board of the American Alternative Medical Association. She is an expert in autism and associated disorders and uses a natural, holistic approach to improve health and well-being.

This insightful and empathetic professional will complement our services by interviewing and counseling the family as a whole, providing additional health and lifestyle advice.

Sherry writes:
In order to improve the special needs child’s wellness, parents need to be healthy – physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually.

Families with autism spectrum disorders experience certain underlying conditions, such as allergies, depression, diabetes, gastrointestinal and/or autoimmune problems, toxic overload, and more. In natural and preventative medicine, the aim is to reduce the chances of those disorders manifesting themselves by providing specific diets and lifestyle changes. The modalities used are:

  1. • Nutritional counseling for the whole family, such as specific foods to be added, or avoided, in the daily diet. Bio-individual, nutritional assessment, and practical advice can be provided, in order to get our kids to eat what is good for them, taking into account that so many are extremely picky eaters.
  2. • Mind/ Body medicine that addresses, but is not limited to, stresses in the family that arise from caring for a child with special needs.
  3. • Detoxification, orthomolecular therapy, environmental health: when our body’s natural detoxification pathways are impaired, we need to detox in order to restore the body’s natural ability to get rid of toxins by itself. With orthomolecular therapy, we adjust deficiencies and excesses of minerals and vitamins in the body. In addition, we can identify possible toxic environmental exposures.
  4. • Herbal medicine: in natural medicine, you can often avoid harsh chemical drugs with herbal remedies that have less side effects. Plus, they can be used for longer periods of time and heal root causes, instead of simply suppressing symptoms.
  5. • Homeopathy and essential oils: many homeopathy protocols and essential oils can help the body heal itself.

To set up a meeting with Dr. Eshraghi, please call our office at 954 873 8413 or 305 720 9099

Rebecca Sherry Eshraghi, DNM, Ph.D.
www.naturalhealthpowerworks.com

*DISCLAIMER: Natural/ holistic health care is not intended as diagnosis, prescription, treatment or cure for any disease, mental or physical, and is not a substitute for regular medical care. Rebecca Sherry Eshraghi is a certified Doctor of Natural Medicine, not licensed in the state of Florida.

To NEBA or Not to NEBA? That is the ADHD Question.

Sunday, August 7th, 2016

EEGleftThe traditional method of achieving a diagnosis of Attention Deficit – Hyperactivity Disorder has involved reviewing the patient’s clinical history, utilization of a variety of scales and psychological criteria, and the exclusion of other medical problems.

For the past few years, an additional diagnostic tool called the Neuropsychiatric EEG-Based Assessment Aid (NEBA), has become available. It is a specific type of electroencephalogram (EEG) that focuses on certain brain waves associated with children who are diagnosed with ADHD.

Advantages:
1) NEBA can be done in any doctor’s office. The reading is accomplished via computer evaluation of specific brain wave patterns. Results are interpreted by professionals, then transmitted to the practitioner.

2) It is relatively simple for some children, aged 6-18 years, to sit still for ~15 minutes, watching a video or being read to by Mom.

3) The FDA approved test has supporting scientific literature, which adds to validity.

4) It may assist parents who are uncertain about the diagnosis or treatment.

Disadvantages:
1) The cost is ~$450. In South Florida, patients have rarely succeeded in obtaining medical insurance coverage. The company does offer helpful resources.

NEBA 22) There are more than a few patients who cannot sit still while the electrodes are applied and the test is administered.

3) There are experts who feel that NEBA testing is not fully proven, and/or necessary.

4) It doesn’t take the place of a formal EEG, and if a patient has other neurologic signs or symptoms, such as staring spells.

Discussion
All the FAQs about NEBA, plus supporting literature, can be found at their website.

One opposing point of view was offered by the director of the Center for Children and Families at Florida International University. Dr. Pelham asked, “What’s the point? We’re not going to run out and buy one of these machines to do diagnoses, because it is totally unnecessary.”

Clinicians do not purchase the equipment. It is rented at a reasonable cost on a monthly basis. The physician receives a portion of the payment for administration and interpretation.

There are options. A thorough medical evaluation may reveal nutritional deficiencies or gastrointestinal conditions that correct signs and symptoms that are falsely diagnosed as ADHD. Getting sleep under control is essential for proper focus and attention.

In younger patients, patience may provide the best outcome. Certain diets can be quite effective. Supplements, such as 5-HTP, magnesium, and essential oils may provide enough relief.  Mild medications, such as guanfacine (Intuniv®), Vayarin®, or even caffeine, can buy a symptomatic child more time without stronger pharmaceuticals.

Without performing formal testing, a trial of one kind or another of stimulant medication is often attempted. Since there are so many types of meds, in so many different forms, with a wide range of therapeutic dosing, this approach can be hit-or-miss.

Conclusion
Without a more reliable objective test, ADHD remains an elusive condition. Parents often feel better when there is more evidence, especially when exploring the possibility of strong stimulant medications.

NeBa 3As a doctor caring for so many patients who present with this diagnosis, I have appreciated the format in which the results are provided to the pediatrician. Based on the score, we are presented with 3 categories; confirmation, support for further testing, and support for testing other conditions. The clinician and the family then discuss additional evaluation and treatment options.

With caveats, and at a cost, this technology represents an additional opportunity to get more complete information about your child’s development.

Acetaminophen And Autism

Sunday, July 10th, 2016
tylenol9

A Tylenol® by any other name; including Xumadol, Paracetamol, Tirol, Calpol, Panadol, etc, etc.

Evidence supporting another pharmaceutical connection to autism was recently presented in a study entitled, Acetaminophen use in pregnancy and neurodevelopment: attention function and autism spectrum symptoms, which appeared in The International Journal of Epidemiology.

Given our current state of ignorance, support, rejection, and often, polarizing opinions have already surfaced.

The Present Study
The authors concluded, “Prenatal acetaminophen exposure was associated with a greater number of autism spectrum symptoms in males and showed adverse effects on attention-related outcomes for both genders…”

Recent Supporting Evidence
2014: Acetaminophen use during pregnancy, behavioral problems, and hyperkinetic disorders
Conclusion – “Maternal acetaminophen use during pregnancy is associated with a higher risk for HKDs and ADHD-like behaviors in children.”

2014: Associations between Acetaminophen Use during Pregnancy and ADHD Symptoms Measured at Ages 7 and 11 Years
Conclusion – These findings strengthen the contention that acetaminophen exposure in pregnancy increases the risk of ADHD-like behaviors.

2013: Prenatal paracetamol exposure and child neurodevelopment: a sibling-controlled cohort
Conclusion – “Children exposed to long-term use of paracetamol during pregnancy had substantially adverse developmental outcomes at 3 years of age.”

Opposing Opinions
2016: Use of acetaminophen (paracetamol) during pregnancy and the risk of autism spectrum disorder in the offspring.
Summary – “… the empirical data are very limited, but whatever empirical data exist do not support the suggestion that the use of acetaminophen during pregnancy increases the risk of autism in the offspring.”

Dr. James Cusack, research director of Autistica, “…insisted there was “not sufficient evidence” to back the suggestion. “The results presented are preliminary in their nature, and so should not concern families or pregnant women.”

The ‘experts’ say, “Don’t even worry about those studies”
claiming a relationship between Autism and Acetaminophen.
Really?
Where is the proof that it’s SAFE?

Discussion
First available in US in the 1950s, Tylenol Elixir for children became even more popular 30 years later when aspirin was reported as a contributing factor to an often fatal Liver – CNS disorder (Reye’s Syndrome). Interestingly, the authors of a 2007 literature review wrote, “The suggestion of a defined cause-effect relationship between aspirin intake and Reye syndrome in children is not supported by sufficient facts.”

Throughout the globe, there are over 100 names for acetaminophen. Plus, it is an ingredient in hundreds of other over-the-counter remedies. It is widespread and readily available. The increased use of this chemical tracks with the explosion of autism into the 21st century.

The medication can cause liver problems and freely crosses the placenta. There are studies that link pretreatment with Tylenol to address fever associated with childhood inoculations, and an increased risk of ASD. Furthermore, the mechanism of action includes the creation of oxidative stress, which is thought to play a significant role in autism.

Conclusion
What about occasional use? The present research concluded, “These associations seem to be dependent on the frequency of exposure.” However, until further investigations are performed, there could be specific times in pregnancy that are more sensitive than others, regardless of the dose.

A single, relatively uncomplicated question – whether there is an association between Tylenol and ASD – needs to be answered. This is but one example of why numerous other substances in our poisoned environment are so difficult to pin down. And, forget about combinations of substances. Why is the establishment so quick to point out the weakness of the present research, and declare that, “Everything is fine?”

Until more information is collected, conservative advice is warranted. Acetaminophen usage in pregnancy should be placed high on the ‘This Deserves Further Study’ list of important autism associations.

Addendum:
From the New York Times – 9/24/26
The Trouble with Tylenol and Pregnancy

Happy Fathers Day – An Autism Perspective

Sunday, June 19th, 2016

Dear Dad,

I don’t speak much (or at all), so you might not hear me say how much I appreciate all that you do. Fathers and kids are supposed to be outside and playing together on a day as special as this. I can do that! Maybe I’m not playing catch or kicking the soccer ball, but I’m having a good time.

I might not show as much love or affection as other children, so you may not see me trying to get your attention and praise. But, some of my stims are doing exactly that – getting your attention. I know that you are trying to figure me out, so thanks for being patient.

I sense things in a different way from others so the foods that everyone eats at this time may not be OK for me to eat. Even if they were, that Dr. Udell has taken away all of the good stuff! Someday I hope to tell you that I know how difficult it is to prepare a GF/CF barbecue.

Lots of people can be a problem for me, so ball games or crowded parks are not my favorite place. Thanks for understanding my issues, and taking us to the beach or just playing by the house so I won’t have a meltdown.

I don’t make friends very well and neighbors or even relatives increase my anxiety, so there won’t be a busy household on your special day. Thanks for keeping me safe and helping me work things out at my own pace.

Everyone is fussing around you today, so I know that they think that you are special, too. Somewhere, inside, I am just like every other kid who loves their Dad, even if I’m not sure what day it is.

Love you, Dad,
Your sons and daughters

Thanks to all the Dads of autistic children for your endurance and support.

Happy Father’s Day

Sincerely,
Brian D. Udell MD

 

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Brian D. Udell MD
6974 Griffin Road
Davie
FL 33314
Office phone – 954-873-8413
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Email bdumd@childdev.org
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