Archive for the ‘HBOT for ASD’ Category

Processing Disorders and Autism

Sunday, September 18th, 2016

EEGleftThere are a number of newly-minted diagnoses that have been invented to explain many of the symptoms of the modern epidemic that covers autism.

They include:

 Sensory Processing Disorder
→ Visual Processing Disorder
→ Auditory Processing Disorder
→ Oppositional Defiance Disorder
→ Attention Deficit Disorder
→ Hyperactivity Disorder

→ Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder
→ Anxiety Disorder
→ Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
→ Explosive Disorder
→ Social Processing Disorder

Diagnosis:
These conditions frequently display such similar general patterns that, depending on a practitioner’s inclination to be a ‘splitter’ or a ‘lumper’, the available treatment regimens could vary widely. For example, AD and HD are usually treated as ADHD, with stimulant medications, even though inattention, poor focus, distractibility and hyperactivity may arise from a variety of physiological conditions.

Likewise, aggression, obsessive – compulsive behaviors, and opposition are usually prescribed anti-anxiety medications, such as Risperdone, Abilify, Intuniv, or even Prozac and Zoloft.

pd1©TheAutismDoctor.com

Some are more or less related, and others may be merely due to immaturity, therefore patience and time will yield preferable results.

Treatments:
It is not difficult to imagine that processing difficulties in vision, hearing, touch, and the other senses, can lead to signs, such as repetitive behaviors or ‘stimming’, to alleviate the sensory overload. Supplements, such as magnesium, turmeric, epsom salt baths, essential oils and even HBOT could address those issues, in addition to traditional therapies. Most parents of children with ASD own at least one trampoline.

Restricted interests and repetitive behaviors are core problems in patients with autism. They are not OCD, and the usual medications are rarely effective, even though the diagnosis prompts traditional physicians to prescribe higher, more frequent doses, and/or a combination of pharmaceutical preparations.

The recognition that processing difficulties underly these unusual behaviors has engendered the protocols that include ABA, PT, OT and other specialty therapies. They require significant resources, but have demonstrated improved outcomes. Certainly this approach is not as risky or potentially harmful as potent medications.

Anxiety appears to be a result of a combination of the other processing difficulties, and social processing disorder is as real as any of the other contrived diagnoses. Early socialization is, therefore, a useful intervention. The fewer pharmacological interventions, the less chance that they will poison the growing brain.

On another hand, certain abnormalities seem to be a result of difficulties in other-than-CNS processing. Aggression, opposition, and explosive behaviors are frequently gut-related. The recognition that autistic behaviors can be ameliorated by restoring the gastrointestinal microbiome has assisted many patients who have been suffering for years.

Conclusions:
The biomedical approach is unique in the treatment of this myriad of medical conditions because the basic assumption is that they are due to a variety of upstream difficulties.

The recognition that, in patients with autism, some neural pathways proceed down the right path, others stumble upon an incorrect route, some thoughts don’t propagate at all, while other symptoms are emanating from elsewhere, goes a long way to assisting patients in their improvement.

Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs – Fall 2016

Sunday, September 11th, 2016

This week, the Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs held its semiannual conference in downtown Atlanta, GA. This is ‘Ground 0’ for practitioners, researchers and professors from all over the world to meet, learn, explore and discuss a myriad of relevant topics.

Members who have been returning for 100’s of lecture hours generally choose the advanced courses. For some, the conference has become a group of ~50 experienced and knowledgeable practitioners who meet to discuss ‘workups’, basic science, relevant research and treatment protocols for those who are most affected with ASD.

Notes and Observations
Day 1 – Tough Cases
I really enjoyed our lectures by the plain-speaking Dr. John Green, of Portland, OR. Dr. Green not only reviewed those who improved because of his medical expertise, but those who got better in spite of him, those who haven’t gotten better, those who got better but he can’t figure out why, and the most frustrating – patients who improve only to suffer frequent relapses.

Dr. Sid Baker, a pioneer of the biomedical movement, described his early medical experiences in Africa that morphed into his lifelong dedication to treating patients with ASD. He expressed his disappointment that so many conventional colleagues disagree with our practice.

Dr. Baker elucidated how he initiates care with new patients. He discussed increasingly resistant cases, covering topics from severe speech apraxia to the approach to children with injurious behaviors.

The first day was filled with the most frustrating and difficult cases you can imagine. Eminent practitioners Drs. James Neuenshwander, Michael Elice, and Julie Buckley challenged our diagnostic and therapeutic knowledge, attempting to navigate the complicated courses of those who improved and those who didn’t.

Day 2
Dr. Daniel Amen‘s morning lecture was entitled “3D Brain SPECT Imaging”. The takeaway message was that SPECT scans – technology – could/should/will become a mainstay for a multitude of CNS disorders. His manner and stories of research, technical evaluation, and clinical practice, were positively spellbinding and inspirational.

Dr. Theoharides presented his research and extensive knowledge about the important role of allergy in ASD. Dr. Theo continues to publish a mountain of monumental works, not only on the topics of autism and the role of mast cells, but treatments, as well.

Toxins were the subject of the afternoon’s lectures. We learned about the identification of substances in the environment that are dangerous, how they are measured, how damage is done, and the means to control and treat. For the skeptical reader, there was a plethora of supporting scientific evidence of the relationships to autism (and many other modern conditions).

As has become customary, Dr. Dan Rossignol rounded up the day with a roundup of all of the latest scientific research. Rapidly.

Day 3 – Advanced Clinical Cases
Severe behaviors and speech apraxia. For patients who are most resistant to conventional and alternative treatments, essential oils, acupuncture, and even worms were explored as possible solutions.

Throughout the afternoon, cases got even tougher! Lyme, Persistent Lyme, Non-Lyme Lyme, PANDAS, PANS, parasites… an increasing number of reasons to have signs and symptoms that are called autism. Such information extends our knowledge and leads to better diagnoses for our patients, and possibilities for treatment.

Dr. Green discussed biomarkers. Though these ‘labs’ are not specific to ASD, per se, this will become a necessary next step to document level of involvement and response to treatments.

A brand new treatment, repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation was presented by Dr. Arun Mukherjee. The jury is still out on this expensive intervention.

Conclusions
One important reason that I return to this meeting, is simply that I feel at home among like-thinking practitioners. Members don’t agree on every subject, but we are respectful and actually enjoy our practices.

In traditional medicine, conferences are basically show-and-tell affairs, where researchers report their data, previously published in medical journals. When doctors think outside the box, practitioners with diverse skills, who are scattered over the globe, discover improved results by networking in this fashion.

Patients, parents, and families can feel confident that progress is being made (slowly), as serious, dedicated doctors continue to try to unravel this modern mystery.

Finally, I am proud to report that, at this meeting, I was awarded Fellowship status in the Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs.

A More Complete Special Needs Practice

Sunday, August 28th, 2016

SherryjpgIn order to achieve optimal outcome in a world of constantly changing complex medical problems, a modern practice needs to embrace the benefits and safety of natural interventions.

Towards that end, The Child Development Center of America welcomes Dr. Sherry Eshraghi of Natural Health Power Works.

Sherry, a mother of a child with autism, has a Doctorate and PhD in Natural Medicine*, and is certified by the Board of the American Alternative Medical Association. She is an expert in autism and associated disorders and uses a natural, holistic approach to improve health and well-being.

This insightful and empathetic professional will complement our services by interviewing and counseling the family as a whole, providing additional health and lifestyle advice.

Sherry writes:
In order to improve the special needs child’s wellness, parents need to be healthy – physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually.

Families with autism spectrum disorders experience certain underlying conditions, such as allergies, depression, diabetes, gastrointestinal and/or autoimmune problems, toxic overload, and more. In natural and preventative medicine, the aim is to reduce the chances of those disorders manifesting themselves by providing specific diets and lifestyle changes. The modalities used are:

  1. • Nutritional counseling for the whole family, such as specific foods to be added, or avoided, in the daily diet. Bio-individual, nutritional assessment, and practical advice can be provided, in order to get our kids to eat what is good for them, taking into account that so many are extremely picky eaters.
  2. • Mind/ Body medicine that addresses, but is not limited to, stresses in the family that arise from caring for a child with special needs.
  3. • Detoxification, orthomolecular therapy, environmental health: when our body’s natural detoxification pathways are impaired, we need to detox in order to restore the body’s natural ability to get rid of toxins by itself. With orthomolecular therapy, we adjust deficiencies and excesses of minerals and vitamins in the body. In addition, we can identify possible toxic environmental exposures.
  4. • Herbal medicine: in natural medicine, you can often avoid harsh chemical drugs with herbal remedies that have less side effects. Plus, they can be used for longer periods of time and heal root causes, instead of simply suppressing symptoms.
  5. • Homeopathy and essential oils: many homeopathy protocols and essential oils can help the body heal itself.

To set up a meeting with Dr. Eshraghi, please call our office at 954 873 8413 or 305 720 9099

Rebecca Sherry Eshraghi, DNM, Ph.D.
www.naturalhealthpowerworks.com

*DISCLAIMER: Natural/ holistic health care is not intended as diagnosis, prescription, treatment or cure for any disease, mental or physical, and is not a substitute for regular medical care. Rebecca Sherry Eshraghi is a certified Doctor of Natural Medicine, not licensed in the state of Florida.

Scripting and Autism

Sunday, July 31st, 2016

lettersFrequently accompanying the emergence of language in children with speech apraxia, are parental concerns that easy questions are only repeated back, or that the child merely recites phrases from videos, etc. They wonder, “How can we fix this?” Well, maybe, it doesn’t need to be fixed.

Definition(s)
It is interesting to note that, one meaning of the word, as it relates to autism, is as a treatmentScripting involves presenting learners with a verbal and/or written description about a specific skill or situation that serves as a model for the learner.”

An end-of-the-century research paper described scripting as, “…high rates of delayed echolalia.” A previously desired goal has been the extinction of that form of language, in order to help the patient appear more ‘normal’.

Described by one speech pathologist is the more commonly accepted definition, “Reciting lines from movies, commercials, books, etc. is a common occurrence… Some experts predict it is a coping mechanism that is used during high stress periods, hence, a form of ‘stimming’.”

Amythest Shaber (“Ask an Autistic”) presents her insightful point of view, by describing two types, echolalial and social scripting. The former is referred to as “TV talk”, while the latter represents language that the individual entrains to express their thoughts about an emotional or complicated situation. Both are forms of communication or opportunities for potential socialization.

Cause(s)
Children are exposed to constant prompting and repetition by therapists, teachers and family. It’s natural. This is one reason that siblings are often so helpful, because they seem to be the ones who best understand their brother or sister, without demanding or correcting.

There is frequent exposure to digital media. Often, an affected child may view just one section of a video over and over. Without constraints on the volume or frequency of viewing time, how can they not have these songs or scenes playing in their head?

You won’t see a 28 month old scripting. Children acquiring language in their second year are not able to observe and recall details like an intelligent 4 year-old. The timing of language acquisition is altered and so the patterns are transformed.

It is the manifestation of limited expressive language. If an individual has only 1/3 of the possibilities for output, repeating a phrase 3 times makes up the difference, regardless of the meaning.

Discussion
In Life, Animated, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Ron Suskind, chronicled his success in reaching his son by encouraging this form of communication.

Likewise, the Son-Rise program advises ‘joining’ your child when they display repetitive scripting behaviors, so that they may be more likely to let the parent into their world.

Parents wish to understand whether such a strategy can be generalized to the ‘real world’? At The Child Development Center, we counsel that this is a good start to useful communication, leading to more coherent speech.

Conclusion(s)
Viewed through the lens of a patient who is recovering from ASD with verbal apraxia, scripting (frequently accompanied by echolalia) represents an expected developmental phase.

Taken one step further, communication reduces frustration and inspires confidence. This encourages more contact with the outside world, and maturity. Parents can then believe in their child’s abilities to enjoy a wider variety of experiences.

When scripting is considered in this light, other new strategies, and successful present ones, should be formalized and tested, in order to help the next generation of patients with ASD to achieve their highest potential.

July 4th with Developmentally Challenged Children

Friday, July 1st, 2016

July4While the rest of the country eagerly awaits an exciting and fun-filled day, there are some families who will wonder how to get through the celebration. Here are the top 10 reasons why this can be so challenging.

July4 littleThe trip to see the fireworks may present the first hurdle. The closer the venue is to home, the better. There will be less echolalia, as in “Get there?Get there?” And, if you need to return early, it’s a shorter journey.

July4 little otherProblems at The Beach, The Lake, The Mountain, etc. Dangers abound. Children with sensory issues do not necessarily perceive the experience as pleasurable; and families may be hard pressed to convince a reluctant child otherwise.

July4 littleSleep. Even if you can somehow avoid the hoopla, the neighborhood is awash in sights and sounds that can keep everybody going well into the night.

July4 little otherDangerous smoke bombs, sparklers, and other explosive devices. Parents need to remain constantly vigilant, lest their affected child jumps in to join in the ‘fun’.

July4 littleCrowds. Relatives, friends, neighbors, and strangers are present in sometimes overwhelming numbers. Then, there are pets, clowns, and other terrifying distractions.

July4 little otherParades. Waiting in line and jockeying to improve visibility of revelry that the children may not understand – or even look at – sometimes seems pointless and counterproductive.

July4 littleThe heat, mosquitoes, and outdoor environment can create more than the expected amount of whining, complaints, and rashes.

July4 little otherOff schedule activities. Often, children get used to any type of routine – even in the summertime. This becomes another day to explain why “We can’t do… this or that.”

July4 littleThe food. Many parents have to choose between enforcing a restricted diet, or letting a child ‘cheat’, perhaps leading to aggressive behaviors in the ensuing hours and days.

July4 little otherThe Fireworks! Really loud noises and flashing lights that may terrify even neurotypical youngsters. Not fun for all.

Our national holiday is supposed to be a joyous family affair, and is often remembered fondly. Parents hope to pass the experience on to the next generation. In certain circumstances, the atypical child presents novel tribulations – including more than a few that couldn’t have even been imagined.

Practicing Autism Treatment

Sunday, June 12th, 2016

The identification of supplements, medications, or protocols that demonstrate safety and usefulness in each individual patient of a certain age and sex, who exhibits a specific set of signs and symptoms, is certainly the most daunting part of this new practice of Pediatric Special Needs medicine.

This week, we received some great news about two of our patients with significant speech delay. Both have been has been getting treatment at The Child Development Center for ~18-24 months, experiencing significant speech apraxia that has been resolving only very slowly, in spite of the usual alternative protocols.

 5 year-old Harry:
Hello Dr. Udell,
I met Billy’s mom, who also sees you. Also by chance, ironically she goes to the same speech therapy place as Harry. We started talking and she suggested I put Harry on a special diet. I have amazing news to report. I am not sure if it is coincidence, but I put Harry on a very strict Gluten free/Casein free/Soy free/Sugar free diet this past Saturday (6/4) and on 6/7 he started talking!!!! He is mostly repeating when I prompt him, most of the language is prompted and a lot of it is not completely clear, you can make out what he is saying though. Very similar to when a child first starts talking. He has said in excess of 70 new words in the past 2 days, not including words he is repeating!!!! I am so excited. I am not sure if you can review the supplements he is taking and let me know if you want me to change anything?? Do you want me to give more B12 shots?? He is currently taking them twice a week. Now that he is “talking” I am not sure if we should alter anything and wanted your opinion/advice. I am going to stop in shortly to pick up more glutathione so please let me know… His bowel movements are improving/changing as well. Please let me know what you think and I will bring him with me next week when I pick up more supplements and have him say “hi” to you…. literally!!!!

dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;"> Thank you so much Dr. Udell!!!
dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;">Dr. U
What a great response… honestly, it’s hard to know why, ’cause he didn’t show a significant IgG elevation against those foods..
It’s peculiar that for some, an SCD diet, GAPS diet, or other specific protocol, helps so much and others not at all.
I would just continue whatever you are doing right now without any changes.
Thanks so much for this information.
As long as you do not mind, I plan on using this as a blog – I will, of course, leave the names anonymous… but it would help so many others re-double their efforts.

Mom
Absolutely, and you can use our names, I don’t mind! (anonymity anyway). I am all for helping as many people as I can with whatever information necessary! I am so grateful to you Dr. Udell for all you have helped us with, I know its still a long road but I am more hopeful then ever. Let me know when you would like to see him next. I will see you sometime next week when I stop in to pick u more GSH…..

 7 year-old Bobby:
Hello wanted to share great news. Bobby scored above average in Reading Comprehension and average in Math. He was promoted to first grade with no issues. Next year he will be in a  Gen Ed classroom for 90 minutes, 5 days a week. He will also share specials and events with his Gen Ed class. 

The teachers wrote, “In the past year, Bobby has come such a long way! Beyond our expectations. God is good. First grade, here we come!!!!”
We would like to thank Dr Udell and his wonderful caring team!  We feel blessed!
Dr. U
What great news… Thanks to all your persistence and hard work, as well.
Really appreciate this update.
Regards,

Discussion
Autism recovery is a marathon, not a sprint. Parents are sometimes quite frustrated when they observe only a fraction of the improvement that they had expected, after only 3 or 4 visits over 6 or 9 months.

Those who discontinue modern alternative autism treatments, delivered by a trained, experienced medical practitioner, are relinquishing valuable time and opportunities for improvement.

Conclusion
The time that it takes to demonstrate improvement varies greatly from patient to patient. Often, the real miracles are the ones that percolate, not the occasional ‘great responder’ who gets better after one or two treatments (as seen on YouTube, of course).

When asked about which intervention generated the most improvement, many parents declare, “Im not sure what made my child better. It was a combination of the doctor and all of the various therapies.”

As long as medical intervention is affordable, safe, and effective, being part of the team that leads to improvement provides more than enough encouragement to continue the fight.

Diatomaceous Earth as Autism Treatment?

Sunday, May 15th, 2016

Parents frequently inquire about, and/or try, various home remedies. In a continuing effort to keep this site complete, by covering as many autism treatment modalities as possible, this discussion will be about diatomaceous earth.

What is DE?
“Isn’t that the stuff that you put into swimming pool filters?” Yes, but the supplement form is “Food Grade, 100% natural, with no side effects.” Except diarrhea, and a host of unstudied changes in fluids and minerals throughout the body.

OSHA and The National Institute for Occupational Safety have set limits for human exposure. Composition varies greatly. According to a prominent proponent, “Out of 600 deposits in the U.S., only 4 rate in purity by FDA standards to be labeled as ‘Food Grade'”.

History
The product was discovered over 150 years ago, and consists of the fossilized remains of millions of microscopic sea critters. According to Wiki, “…It is used as a filtration aid, mild abrasive in products including metal polishes and toothpaste, mechanical insecticide, absorbent for liquids, matting agent for coatings, reinforcing filler in plastics and rubber, anti-block in plastic films, porous support for chemical catalysts, cat litter, activator in blood clotting studies, a stabilizing component of dynamite, and a thermal insulator.”

Use in Health
There are claims of more than 1,500 benefits; including, lowering blood pressure and cholesterol, healing sore joints, healthier hair, skin, teeth, gums, and nails, better bowel movements and it is supposedly safe for pregnant women (no source).

Use in Autism
Agents that remove toxic metals – chelators – have been used as autism treatments since the turn of this century. When detoxification became a popular treatment, DE was introduced. As the issue of symptom-causing parasites (including fungi, viri, and bad bacteria) waxes, this cathartic product has received new mention. Anecdotal stories abound. Sensory issues, ADHD, behavioral disorders, and even speech, have apparently been changed for the better after administration, for some.

Discussion
A Google search for ‘diatomaceous earth’ and ‘autism’ returns >27,000 responses. A Google Scholar search for this supplement returns ZERO valid, scientific hits.

The problem originates with the fact that conventional – and even biomedical treatments – are not relieving enough people who display the signs and symptoms of ASD. Home remedies are attempted to fill the void. However, autism consists of many conditions, so comparing disparate treatments is nearly impossible, outside of a scientific study. Importantly, parents are not aware of the parameters to follow; including laboratory testing of electrolytes, minerals, and the health of key organs, such as the liver and kidney.

It has been the experience of many practitioners that such gut-cleansing treatments – from worms, to CD, to Miralax™ –  only help selected patients, and then, for a brief period of time. Plus, conditions may worsen. Expect a paucity of testimonials about those negative reactions. Plus only a few warnings appear in the web.

Conclusions
Practitioners should listen carefully to parents who discover supplements that improve their children with ASD. A variety of valuable information has been provided, moving successful protocols forward. Likewise, it is our job to consider the scientific implications, as well. Unregulated substances lead to metabolic consequences that have yet to be elucidated.

As with other alternative alternatives, more reliable data is needed before experimenting on our children.

Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs 2016 Spring Conference

Sunday, May 1st, 2016

Practitioners, such as myself, find that it is necessary to attend the bi-annual Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs conference for two important reasons. First, to listen to experts from all over the world present their knowledge and latest research. Second, to network with, and learn from, other like-minded practitioners.

What I Liked Best
This year, I chose the ADHD path. The workups that were presented tended to be somewhat complex, and perhaps unattainable for many patients. The bottom line was to get a medical evaluation. The differential diagnosis ranges from thyroid to PANDAS. Mostly all agreed that stimulant and psychotropic meds should not be the first line in treatment. One professor spent some time questioning the diagnosis, itself, and how the modern world has contributed to the epidemic.

What I Liked Least
Traveling all the way to Costa Mesa, CA. Course work is 8 hours per day, so no time for Disneyland, etc.

This Year’s Major Focus
Mitochondrial function continued to play a big role in the presentations. The advanced courses involved lots of methylation, detoxification, and energy production diagrams. The newest twist has been the addition of genetic testing to better determine the cause(s) of inadequately functioning biologic pathways. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and ‘epigenetics’ were the buzzwords – how individual genes interact with the environment and within the individual leading to dysfunction and downstream signs and symptoms.

Topics That Were Discussed in Passing
Microarray genetic testing, covering multiple genes, did not play a big part in this year’s talks. Discussions about childhood immunizations underlie a great deal of the members’ conversations; specifically the lack of solid scientific evidence for safety in high risk populations. Attendees are not against vaccinations, by the way. Lyme disease was discussed in general, and as that inflammatory process relates to other infectious-metabolic conditions.

Subjects Not Formally Presented
GcMAF and nagalase levels. Some patients have indicated that a useful, safe supply may become available, so that will help determine future use. As well, chlorine dioxide, hyperbaric oxygen treatment, helminths, medical marijuana, and stem cell therapy were not offered by this year’s presenters.

Conclusion
It is disappointing to return from such conferences without that ‘magic bullet’. Just standing around, listening to Sid Baker speak about how he got interested in autism, or asking him how the ‘ion cleaning’ footpath worked, is worth the price of admission, however. This science started with Dr. Baker, and he continues to be an inquisitive, gentle force for hope, 40 years later.

In the absence of a sufficient population of scientists who are willing and available to address this modern epidemic of childhood developmental problems, this meeting stands as a bastion against the current state of ignorance.

Neurodiversity and Autism

Sunday, April 3rd, 2016

Hands2We are not going to cure cancer. Eventually, medical science will successfully treat melanoma, breast cancer, or lymphoma. One disease at-a-time, with discovery and experience along the way. Likewise, there will come an understanding of the underlying causes, treatments and prevention for all the types and conditions that appear with signs and symptoms now considered ASD.

Calling the epidemic ‘Autism Spectrum Disorder’ is, paradoxically, both accurate and imprecise. It is valid to the extent that, given our present state of ignorance, there exists an array of individuals who fit a common diagnostic category. However, it comprises too many people with a myriad of conditions. Under the present state-of-the-art, there are those who are just, well, neuro-diverse!

Maybe it’s Asperger’s syndrome (OK to say, before DSM 5.0). Perhaps, it’s extreme ADHD, with a bit of sensory issues. There is oppositional behavior disorder, visual and/or auditory, sensory processing and executive function disorder. How about social processing disorder?

The A Word
A new BBC series entitled ‘The A Word’ was recently reviewed by the New York Times. While it’s admirable to expose the public to the challenges of families who are affected by this modern malady, as a pediatrician who has been practicing for over 40 years, the comments by one reviewer (who co-authored an article with his autistic daughter) gave me cause for concern.

“Years ago, black people or gay people were on telly purely as black people or gay people. Autistic people still are — they appear on programs purely as autistic people,” he said. “It would be great to see autistic people in TV dramas who are just there, like any other character.”

ARE YOU KIDDING ME?
Who ever said, “We need to hear more tuberculosis patients on the radio?” Or, “People with polio don’t appear enough on TV.” The scientific community astutely researched, understood, and successfully treated those emerging medical conditions.

It’s not just neurodiversity
This is why a more precise diagnosis is needed. So far, I see speech apraxia and oral-motor dysfunction (including extreme feeding disorders) as THE LINE. It impedes even the brightest and most talented of individuals.

In addition to the lack of communication, aggression (against self or others) is the most perplexing and difficult-to-treat feature of ASD. In toddlers, negative behaviors usually emanate from discomfort, pain, or unmet needs. It is the discovery and treatment of such co-morbidities that enables clinicians to successfully address those youngest patients. As children age, that lack of contact and the frustration that accompanies loneliness and isolation often result in tantrums or other negative behaviors.

Discussion
By the way, the difficulty is with speech and communication, not S&L. Patients are not ‘confused’ by multiple languages, ‘spoiled’ by grandparents, or ‘isolated’ by numerous siblings. In our multi-cultural world, the most incommunicative children can follow directions given by a variety of non-English-speaking caregivers. Additionally, even sign language is difficult for those who are most affected.

I’m all for embracing the neurodiverse universe. Its inhabitants are interesting and have provided the horsepower for imagination that has helped change the world. When people who are different require special instruction or more understanding, popularizing their plight makes sense.

Conclusion
Doctors are not seeking to  ‘cure’ neurodiversity. On the contrary, we ought to learn about different brains and embrace their uniqueness. However, to the extent that autism is considered “Locked in autism silent prison,” practitioners need to understand and treat this enigmatic medical condition.

There is neurodiversity. And, there are autisms.

Top 10 Reasons Why Autism Remains a Mystery

Sunday, October 18th, 2015

As regards the explosion of individuals who are diagnosed with autism, progress  seems agonizingly slow. It is the parents of affected children who are leading the way, and traditional explanations are, literally, the thinking of the last century. Why is information about prevention, cause and treatment so sparse?

Researchers are still debating the existence of an Autism Epidemic. Why should it matter whether there are more affected individuals because of reason “A” or reason “B”? That confusion holds up funding for studies, however.

Professionals continue to argue about the ‘when, how, and who’ of assigning an accurate diagnosis, which impedes trials seeking to explore prevention or treatment.

The likelihood of discovering a ‘magic bullet’ is low. There will probably need to be multiple treatments for the signs and symptoms documented in the DSM 5.0, depending on the myriad of causes and presentations.

There are no practical, accepted biomarkers for diagnosis. This is especially important in order to evaluate treatments(s) in an acceptably objective manner. This discovery alone could significantly advance research.

Surrounding the topic of ASD are highly charged issues, such as vaccinations, or complicated treatments, such as HBOT and chelation. Rather than stimulate further investigation, the situation appears to impede conventional researchers from documenting efficacy (or the lack thereof) in such controversial interventions.

Successful treatments of the various co-morbidites displayed by autistic patients, such as those offered at The Child Development Center of America, which combine biomedical and conventional protocols, are frequently viewed with skepticism, at best. These protocols deserve the attention of the medical establishment.

 We drink red G-2 and it comes out yellow.
Ever wonder where the red goes?
(hint… it’s not digested)

Proven associations, such as toxins, poisoned food and the environment, are not popular areas for discussion. Preventive measures receive little promotion or even acknowledgment. Cleaning up can be accomplished, at a cost. This involves not only public education and policy making, but personal choices, as well.

Antibiotics and steroids continue to be overprescribed by doctors, and are requested or too readily accepted by patients. There is a price to be paid for taking strong pharmaceuticals for every ‘cold’ or rash.

Research findings that implicate genetic variations imply feelings of futility about the plausibility of successful intervention. “If it’s genetic, we can’t fix it.” But, every day there are new discoveries about personalized medical treatments for autoimmune conditions or cancer, for example. Tiny chromosomal errors are not insurmountable.

Tools for early diagnosis and intervention, already proven successful, continue to elude the pediatrician’s black bag. Psychiatrists and neurologists, likewise, employ old-fashioned thinking and potent, risky medications that are barely and rarely effective.

In order to take autism research and treatment into the 21st century, organizations that are responsible for actually providing answers need to address these concerns and get serious about forming a unified and thoughtful approach to this medical puzzle.

Categories Archives Links Contact Us

Brian D. Udell MD
6974 Griffin Road
Davie
FL 33314
Office phone – 954-873-8413
Fax – 954-792-2424

Email bdumd@childdev.org
Copyright © TheAutismDoctor.com 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
All Rights Reserved