Archive for the ‘Conferences’ Category

A(nother) Laboratory Test(s) for Autism

Sunday, March 19th, 2017

A key piece of the autism puzzle appears to have been confirmed in an article published this week in the Public Library of Science Open Access Journal, Computational Biology. The title of the article is Classification and adaptive behavior prediction of children with autism spectrum disorder based upon multivariate data analysis of markers of oxidative stress and DNA methylation.

The news has already been reported in popular media as “A Blood Test for Autism“. Here is my clinical interpretation.

The Study
The data was collected from patients in previous studies, and included 83 children, aged 3-10 years, with ASD. Utilizing very dense, complicated statistics that were based on biochemical laboratory data, researchers identified neurotypical vs. autistic individuals, who already had the diagnosis, based on conventional developmental testing.

The chosen pathways evaluated abnormalities in methylation, an epigenetic function, and detoxification.

Specificity and sensitivity were very reliable, “96.1% of all neurotypical participants being correctly identified as such while still correctly identifying 97.6% of the ASD cohort.”

Discussion
Contrary to what the headlines proclaim, this is not a single test; it’s research material that is based on a number of not-yet-readily-available laboratory findings.

The biomarkers represent a final common pathway, not necessarily a cause. Although the data correlated with autism ‘scores’, it really wasn’t meant to discriminate for the various kinds of developmental challenges, such as those children who are mostly aggressive, immune, apraxic, or suffer gastrointestinal abnormalities.

Such an analysis begs the question, “Can it be used for prospective improvement – to follow course of the condition?”

Conclusion
The modern epidemic of childhood autism is extremely complicated and difficult to pin down for research purposes. This study renders a modern means to evaluate a myriad of variables. The metabolic pathways under scrutiny represent a confirmation of the roles of genes and toxins.

As with other ‘earliest diagnosis’ studies, this paper serves to solidify the concept that earlier diagnosis should lead to earlier interventions, with improved outcomes.

For those of us who are practicing ‘alternative’ medicine, it is comforting to rediscover that the treatments included in our modern arsenal of biomedical protocols are consistent with these findings.

Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs Spring 2017 Conference

Sunday, March 12th, 2017

At the conference with Yale prof Dr. Sid Baker – one of the originators of biomedical treatment

If practitioners wish to become more effective in the diagnosis and treatment of children who suffer developmental challenges, it will require a new paradigm. Therefore, attending conferences, such as the Simons Foundation for Autism Research, the Autism Research Institute, and the Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs, is essential to acquiring that knowledge.

This year’s advanced sessions introduced a completely new functional medicine topic – Hormones from Pregnancy to Teens. Dr. Cindy Schneider examined the differences between the brain anatomy, physiology, and chemistry that might explain how ASD affects males vs. females, and the consequences as we age. Additionally, there are the special complications incurred throughout puberty, with important implications regarding effective treatments.

Dr. Stephen Genuis‘ presentations, Hormone Disrupting Agents, provided a fascinating complement to that lecture. He highlighted the chronic nature of ASD, and the disrupting effects of toxic agents in our modern environment. A key component is the toxic load; if topical agents represent ounces, ingested compounds represent pounds, and the air that we breathe can be expressed in tons of potential poisonous compounds. And, it takes months or years to eliminate what takes days or weeks to ingest. He also pointed out that medical school curricula and training in toxicology is woefully inadequate.

Dr. Lynne Mielke rounded out the day by submitting actual case histories of young people with mysterious medical problems. Her background includes personal experience, extensive knowledge and patient care. This physician’s psychiatric/neurological point-of-view was especially insightful and provided valuable material that directly applied to the audience’s practice population.

Day 2
Another novel and exciting topic was Preconception Care: A New Standard of Care in Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Dr. Genuis discussed the increased risks of preterm birth, Caesarian section delivery, and chronic childhood illness, such as cancers, diabetes, autoimmune conditions, autism and  ADHD.
He presented the emerging research of toxicant exposures and nutritional deficiencies that continue to escalate. Metabolic disruptions may easily ensue, leading to many of the persistent disorders that are now experienced by an increasing number of children, although they may look perfectly normal at birth.

Such difficulties seem imminently preventable in the population, and there appears to be a lack of awareness in the majority of obstetricians. Even fathers who are exposed to toxic agents may become a vector for such later difficulties. Dr. Genuis then discussed the means to eliminate the myriad of  toxins – mostly by sweating, but some by other means, such as fasting or medication.

Dr. Elizabeth Mumper followed with an in-depth discussion about the lack of awareness of proper nutrition, environmental factors, the hazards of indiscriminate use of antibiotics, and poorly researched vaccinations, which appear to be significant factors leading to autism. She even offered another alternative schedule for high-risk infants and toddlers.

Nutritionist Robert Miller presented a very dense lecture, attempting to answer the complicated question, “What can be done about all of those new-fangled genetics tests?” Suffice it to say, that offering will take some time to digest.

Day 3
The lectures consisted of an assortment of the faculty’s most difficult cases. Experts included Drs. Baker, Frye, and Neuenschwander; and the audience wasn’t too shabby, either. Case histories were offered about families who experience unimaginable, incomprehensible challenges; from self-mutilation, to children attempting suicide (sometimes, successfully), to attacks on their caregivers.

The take-home items from such discussions are simply, “How can we prevent this, and successfully treat our population?”

Conclusion
It’s fortuitous that Dr. Ratajczek’s article, which examined the research about vaccine safety, was published at the time of this seminar. Participants have been wringing our hands about the ‘disconnect’ between what we (and many parents) experience every day, and conventional medicine’s dogma. The article might act as fuel-to-the-fire for some, be ignored by the majority, but represents some slight measure of vindication for our hard-working tribe.

We are getting only marginally closer to our understanding about the cause(s), treatment(s), and prevention(s) for autism. Much more research is needed. The Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs provides a valuable platform for presenting, evaluating, and disseminating such expertise.

Observations on an Autism Workshop

Sunday, March 5th, 2017

March 5, 2017.
Yesterday, I had the opportunity to be part of a panel for the South Florida Autism Charter Schools‘ medical workshop. In attendance were ~50 parents, and a group of 9 professionals; including dentists, a pediatric neurologist, an Ob-Gyn, a pediatrician, a psychologist and behavioral therapist.

My role was to answer questions regarding the biomedical approach to ASD.
Here are some of the things that I learned:

Parents are extremely frustrated by the lack of available services for special needs patients. “He’s too big for our MRI machine,” or “They do not know how to handle her aggression,” were common complaints. Frankly, the presenters had few useful suggestions that the families hadn’t already attempted.

Therapists and administrators wanted to be sure that parents take advantage of all available means for relief, such as following up with a medication schedule, and notifying appropriate personnel about serious issues in a timely manner.

There was a general dissatisfaction about the medical community’s lack of understanding regarding special needs families. Since the panel was composed of busy professionals willing to give up a Saturday morning, they were basically ‘preachin’ to the choir’.

Everyone agreed that the ideal situation would be a ‘one-stop shop’ for patients to get all necessary testing and treatment. Cancer Treatment Centers of America, for example, advertises that availability, and many facilities now afford such service. It may be some time before supply catches up to the demand, for special needs children, however.

I enjoyed an in-depth discussion with Dr. Jose Berthe about the proper time, types of evaluation, and medical interventions, as girls with developmental challenges get older.

Dr. Yadira Martinez-Fernandez contributed her comprehensive knowledge of autism and cardiac health. Affected children who suffer genetic or other complicated disorders, or who take certain medications, may be at an increased risk, which can be ascertained by appropriate evaluation, such as blood pressure monitoring, or an EKG.

The dental experts reviewed their approach to oral health; from how to get a successful visit, to evaluation and treatment of the common symptom of teeth grinding.

Dr. Carrie Landess provided her unique perspective and valuable insights, as a pediatric neurologist who is also the parent of a child with ASD.

My good friend and colleague, Dr. Linda Colon, offered several practical solutions for the challenged families’ concerns. The general pediatric community would find a great deal more cooperation from families, were they to adopt her thoughtful and empathetic point-of-view toward the autism epidemic.

Dr. Moodie, the Executive Director, is a fireball. Her experience, knowledge, insight, and dedication is leading to tangible changes in the care of children with developmental difficulties.

Conclusion
Parents want – and deserve – more answers, better service, and faster roads to improvement for their special needs children. The South Florida Autism Charter School is doing a great job in providing a tangible means toward those ends.

Recent Research about MRIs for Autism

Sunday, February 26th, 2017

Since the outbreak of autism, various attempts have been made to utilize modern imaging techniques to provide a more precise diagnosis. Here are two recent stories that warrant recognition and comment.

Relationship between brain stem volume and aggression in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder is not the first of its kind to describe an inverse correlation between the size of that part of the central nervous system and ASD. However, it is the first to possibly relate increased aggression with a measurable parameter.

One expert describes, “The brain stem serves as a bridge in the nervous system. All the fibers that go from the body to the brain and vice versa go through the brain stem. It sits at the top of the spinal column in the center of the brain… handles basic functions like breathing, swallowing, heart rate, blood pressure, sleeping and vomiting. The brain stem does not play a part in higher cognitive functions…”

The authors concluded, “Understanding brain differences in individuals with ASD who engage in aggressive behavior from those with ASD who do not can inform treatment approaches.” Indeed, disruptive behaviors describe a type of autism that is particularly difficult to address, and may even require potent medications.

The second article was Early brain development in infants at high risk for autism spectrum disorder, in Nature. The research revealed that surface area enlargement between 6 and 12 months precedes brain volume overgrowth observed between 12 and 24 months, which was linked to the emergence and severity of autistic social deficits. “These findings demonstrate that early brain changes occur during the period in which autistic behaviors are first emerging.”

The good
Both investigations serve to encourage the idea that timely detection leads to earlier intervention, which leads to improved outcomes. Even that obvious fact continues to be debated in some forums.

The bad
These studies are descriptive, and so they do not provide answers about cause and effect, form as relates to function, underlying genetic, nutritional or toxic states. There are many presentations of the condition, and research generally tries to get as homogeneous a group as possible – perhaps not representative of a larger group. More information is required to deduce practicality or therapeutic intervention.

The ugly
Emily Willingham, ‘science’ writer at Forbes.com, used the latter study to ‘prove’ and promote her vaccines-are-safe-for-all-kids campaign. Not a word about ‘shots’ was mentioned in the entire article, and this pro-inoculation zealot found a way to insert that thought into unsuspecting readers, in her piece entitled, “An Unexpected Takeaway From The Early Autism Diagnosis Study”. Yep, Em, that was unexpected!

Conclusion
One investigation delineated decreased brain size in one region, and the other demonstrated increased overall brain volume. A recent paper about neuro-imaging technology offered this advice: “… heterogeneous and definitive neural correlates in ASD have yet to be identified… findings from multiple independent neuroimaging meta-analyses in ASD appear discrepant…”

Such research represents further attempts to explain the medical issues. This should encourage other universities and research institutions to explore these topics, as well.

As is frequently the case, for now, the use of MRI technology to elucidate the pathophysiology and diagnosis of ASD deserves further study.

Processing Disorders are Autism

Sunday, February 12th, 2017

With all of the professionals who care for individuals experiencing signs and symptoms that are presently classified as ASD, it isn’t surprising that the organization of problems reflects the point of view of each discipline.

To the extent that nomenclature describes identifiable, clearly understood pathways, it can improve our understanding of function (or the lack thereof), as it relates to structure (but not necessarily vise-versa). Often, however, researchers utilize long, complicated terms that merely restate the obvious. Such designations may not provide additional insight, which is sorely needed if we are to reverse the named condition.

Selective eating disorder = picky eater

Visual processing disorder = sees things differently

Auditory processing disorder = hears things differently

Sensory processing disorder = feels things differently

Oppositional defiance disorder = responds to everything the opposite way

Attention deficit disorder = won’t focus on non-preferred activities

Hyperactivity disorder = can’t sit still

ADHD = both of the above

Sleep disorder = takes longer to fall asleep, wakes up frequently, or both

Social anxiety disorder = uncomfortable around others

Obsessive compulsive disorder = repetitive behaviors and restricted interests

Cognitive processing disorder =?Executive functioning disorder = ?Motor planning disorder = ?expressive language deficiency = ?receptive language disruption = ?doesn’t (appear to) learn/listen/remember.

Discussion
Each of these labels accurately reflects some condition frequently experienced by individuals with ASD. Professionals may utilize such information to address a patient’s issues, but it can be quite confusing when complex jargon is invoked to explain an intervention to the family.

“Why is my child exhibiting this aberrant behavior?” Until much more research identifies actual, measurable, specific physiological states, my response is, “Signals sometimes go to the right place and can perform the appropriate function, the wrong place and lead to an incorrect response, or just bounce around and diminish.”

At least, an understanding about, and explanation of, similar terms utilized by other disciplines would ease parents’ concerns that, “Somebody missed something,” about their child.

Conclusion
I recently spoke with a mom who was told about a feedback loop issue in her child with motor planning deficiencies and sensory processing difficulties. Each therapist provided a valid diagnostic label. I suggested that she focus on the skills required in order for her 4 year-old to play with other children.

Rather than invoking esoteric, complicated language as to theoretical cause, the focus should be on assisting patients’ ability to achieve required skills, such as spontaneous speech, self-control, eye contact, motor proficiency and socialization.

Smooth, efficient processing between our body and brain is the goal. In human development, when systems fail to mesh in the correct fashion, what we observe is called autism.

Good Doctors for Autism and ADHD

Sunday, January 15th, 2017

The Best Autism Doctors has been a popular story on this website. My point was that patients need a competent clinician, and that ‘BEST’ is not necessarily relevant, necessary, or attainable for each child. Considering these issues will help a parent make a more informed decision.

All doctors
‘Good’ doctors thoroughly address your specific problems, so their knowledge and abilities are of upmost importance. Patients expect a clean, well-run office, with friendly, competent, respectful staff and up-to-date equipment.

We want caring clinicians who give us the time to explain our problems and really listen. Patience is key. We expect calls to be returned, especially regarding test results – with kind, compassionate responses. We want to be able to refer this professional to others.

Autism specialists
The qualities that make an effective doctor for patients with ASD and ADHD should also include the following:

Adequate observation by the treating physician. Remember, if you’ve seen one child with autism… Personnel trained to recognize ASD may not necessarily consider metabolic or gastrointestinal conditions, so collaboration with the doctor is paramount.

Up-to-date labs, individualized for each patient, with regular testing should be performed. A recent study demonstrated that traditional specialists  “… fail to order tests that should be routinely performed and often order tests that are not routinely indicated yet are neither benign nor inexpensive. Recommended molecular genetic tests are often not ordered.”

Doctors who successfully treat patients with ASD have an extensive education, experience, and devote the time to rigorous continuing education. For parents wishing to go to the ‘best’ autism doctors, membership in the Medical Academy of Pediatric Special Needs should be prerequisite, until some better medical society comes along.

Especially regarding the expenses associated with an autism diagnosis, supplements need to be made available at a fair price. There are thousands of products that claim better toleration, improved absorption, fewer side effects, etc. Your ‘good’ clinician is best suited to make the correct choice. Also, there should be a willingness to explore alternative preparations that make sense.

Interventions that are tailored, not only to a patient’s symptoms, but reflect underlying, treatable problems. As one protocol fails to demonstrate effectiveness, the approach should be altered – sometimes frequently. Professional explanations, appropriate literature, and use of web information goes a long way to reducing the confusion of this difficult developmental diagnosis.

Close follow-up of the clinical course, response to treatment, and childhood development can fashion an improved outcome. Therefore, some method of reasonable response time to emails, phone calls, etc. is an important feature.

‘Good’ doctors show a willingness to collaborate with the traditional therapies and therapists. An experienced staff, who frequently are well-versed in autism, can be a great resource regarding such advice. Parents frequently have questions about issues, from academic environments to alternative treatments.

Regarding the use of supplements and medications, “starting slow and going low,” offers the best opportunity for the parents – the patient’s expert – to report positive and negative results. Complex and/or confusing protocols may lead to more negative results than necessary. Parents should understand specific directions, with as few changes as possible prior to instituting another shift.

‘Good’ autism doctors advise about the efficient use of resources. There are a myriad of interventions, from affordable and readily available vitamins, to expensive hardware and complicated procedures. Due to a paucity of repeatable research, the doctor who studies all possibilities, and understands a family’s resources, can give the best advice. Also, referral and willingness to collaborate with appropriate medical sub-specialists will streamline the process of recovery.

Conclusion
Indeed, even the BEST autism doctor may not be able to assist a severely affected patient. Understanding and effectively treating speech apraxia, repetitive thoughts and behaviors (scripting and stimming), and aggression may be beyond our science, at this time.

This does not mean that parents should not continue to search for better treatments, but that a reasonable workup by a competent, caring clinician who persists in exploring ongoing problems may provide the most effective treatment available.

Becoming a good doctor for this mysterious diagnosis is not so much,
“Thinking outside the box.”
Successful results occur when professionals
Connect the dots • — • — •

Getting Children to Take Their Supplements & Medications

Sunday, October 30th, 2016

take-medA common feature among children who suffer from sensory processing issues is their reluctance to take the very preparations that would help attenuate such disturbances, and the will to get their way.

Here are some tips and observations, gathered over the years at the Child Development Center of America, that may be of some use as a parent attempts to cajole junior into ‘taking his medicine.’

B-twelve lollipops simply don’t cut it. There are various strategies for those who won’t take subcutaneously administered methyl-B12, from a middle-of-the-night sneak attack, to an early morning assault. Expensive topical anesthetic agents are rarely required or helpful. Squeamish parents may hire a nurse, or ask a friend or relative. In school, we practiced on fruit. Occasionally, there have been parents who take their child to the doctor, until they become more comfortable.

Dermal creams can be an excellent alternative. Naltrexone administered in this manner may alleviate sensory issues and enable more generalized compliance. Magnesium, epsom salt baths and other agents may be quite helpful. On the other hand, every supplement does not work in a cream form, due to its composition and absorption.
This is a propitious time to mention the use of essential oils. Calming to the mind and body, these may be just the ticket for getting a mildly oppositional youngster to comply.

Many families mix preparations with preferred liquids and foods. Should a parent risk a small volume of casein or other forbidden fare? Frankly, occasionally, that may be the better option. On the other hand, some children may then refuse taking even that ONE liquid that they consider acceptable. Starting with very low doses of the offending agent may work.
We recommend oil-based products for the like; e.g. almond butter or mustard, if the supplement comes in that form. Applesauce is good for gloppy goodies.

Some children may respond to mechanical strategies, such as practicing with candy, drinking fluid first, or placing the pill in just the right part of the tongue. Another strategy involves the use of a pill swallowing cup. A non-scientific review of our experience at The Center has not found those of any real value. They look scary, and we couldn’t give them away.

Ask the occupational, behavioral or physical therapist to assist in the learning process. To the extent that the professional recognizes – and believes in – the accompanying improvements for their job, they should embrace their role in assisting the process. In a similar vein, alternative techniques practiced by chiropractors and reflexologists might include their additional expertise in helping a child acquire this skill.

Social stories may be a great aid for certain children. An artistic parent may even be able to create one (digital or analog) with your child’s pictures and voices, enabling the child to view the process and diminish anxiety. The propensity for affected children to perseverate on youtube videos might provide an opportunity to encourage an understanding and acceptance of this technique.

Most parents have already exhausted the role of bribery. Often, families have found this strategy of limited benefit after a lifelong pursuit of compliance in one or another less-daunting behaviors. From this perspective, and towards this end, this could be utilized as one of the ONLY times that your child gets the iThing.

Make sure that the child is on the most healthful diet. For parents who believe that the foods their children eat have little to affect on behavior, you should at least give a try. The end point might be as ‘simple’ as your child’s understanding and compliance.

For certain preparations, there is always the rectal route. The child may accept that oral is preferable, if they don’t bite and run for the hills (and lock the door).
Sometimes this one can backfire – literally.

Develop the right attitude. With autism, the senses of smell, taste and texture are involved. Oral-motor functioning is weak. There are medical reasons for patient refusal. One inconsequential substance may be misperceived as awful, however another foul-smelling product may not even be noticed. Plus, some therapeutic protocols may increase aggressive behaviors for brief periods. For most children, reasoning is of little value. “Because mommy says so!”

Truth be told, only ~1% refuse just about everything. Such children won’t be told, taught, or tricked. The parent has to decide how important the supplement, how likely it is to work, and weigh the consequences of continued non-compliance. But, getting a child to accept only one or two of these preparations may jump start a pathway to increased compliance in other endeavors, as well.

I never had a juvenile arthritis patient, or child with diabetes or other significant malady, where the parent didn’t bite the bullet and do whatever is necessary. To the extent that the practitioner and parent believes in results, the deed will be done.

As always, knowledgeable and experienced parents are invited to offer their stellar suggestions…

Signs of Autism in an Infant’s First Year

Sunday, October 23rd, 2016

neighborsAs a neonatal-perinatal specialist, I have been responsible for the health of tens of thousands of the smallest, sickest, and most vulnerable patients. Plus, in the past decade, I have focused on learning about, diagnosing, and treating children who are affected with the newest childhood developmental epidemic, Autism Spectrum Disorder.

It is fair to say, then, that my observations have a degree of validity not necessarily found by simply shopping around town, when parents seek answers about their child’s condition. Special needs pediatric medicine is my natural state. little-leoSo, while walking our Yorkie recently, as I was exchanging pleasantries with a neighbor, I couldn’t help but ‘examine’ the infant in the carriage. “Is this kid developing correctly?” I thought. “Are there red flags? What further questions would I want to know, short of becoming a nuisance, to help the family?”

Here is my list of key questions to best assess whether I should encourage a parent to further explore their infant’s development:

Pregnancy:
What is the age of mother and father?
Perhaps it isn’t the assisted pregnancy (in-vitro fertilization, etc.) that is the problem, since that has not been scientifically proven. But, an advanced maternal or paternal age have been shown to represent a significant association.
little-thought-cloudNo need to ask, however; I can ascertain that information by checking with my wife.

Has there been any medication use, but especially tylenol and psychoactive substances, even if they were prescribed by a doctor.
little-thought-cloudMaybe that’s too nosy.

Labor & Delivery:
Was it a full term pregnancy?
Contrary to some theories, I do not believe that pitocin (intravenous medicine given to enhance contractions) is a related issue. Rather, the fact that labor is prolonged may be due to hypotonia in the fetus, and he/she is not contributing in the tug of war. So, ‘Failure to Progress’, and late deliveries are a particular concern. Conversely, if the child was preterm, that is a significant risk factor, as well.

Did the child go home from the hospital with Mom?
This information could open up a host of possible associations, from the early use of antibiotics to birth defects.
“Why are you asking so many questions, Doc?”

Newborn:
“Well, I’m just interested. Did the child breast feed?”
Answers in the negative that are due to ‘poor suck’, breast milk ‘intolerance’, or GERD definitely increase the number of red flags related to those children who demonstrate future developmental concerns.

Infant:
Does the child have to go to the doctor often?
Numerous visits to the pediatrician or specialists imply an underlying medical problem, including asthma, eczema, feeding and stooling problems, which are frequently associated in children with autism.

Did the baby have plagiocephaly (flat head), torticollis (wry neck), or a large head size? Does he make good eye contact and follow a moving human face? In the second half of the first year, does the baby crawl/walk OK? Is there vocalization?
little-thought-cloudSkip the interrogation, I can observe many of those signs for myself.

Conclusion:
When the majority of answers are of concern, there may be enough warning signs to warrant further exploration. On one single day last week, I took care of 16 children who had criteria consistent with ASD. We don’t need more patients with autism. Something is just wrong.

Your neighbor should not be making developmental assessments, even if he is TheAutismDoctor. Pediatricians can, and must, do more to examine your infant’s development and help stem the tide. The only question should be, “What does your doctor think?”

For the clinician who may complain that this line of questioning causes unnecessary apprehension for Mom and Dad, my reply is that they are worried, anyway. Rather than help, a practitioner’s cavalier dismissal that, “I wouldn’t be concerned about that,” carries little substance in the face of this wide-ranging malady known as ASD.

Staffing for the Autism Epidemic

Sunday, October 9th, 2016

The Child Development Center has been blessed to experience a stream of wonderful, young, eager students wishing to learn about caring for special needs pediatric patients. Some go into ‘the business’, while others have gone on to a variety of great life adventures. We are also lucky to have our superb Practice Manager, Karen Vossen, who is an exemplary role model, teaching parents and staff alike, how to handle the patients.

gabiskywalker

The Force is strong with this one

Our latest graduate, Gabriella Tabib, has chosen to pursue this line of work. Here is what she wrote about her time here at The Center:

I started working with Dr. Udell during my final year of undergraduate training. After listening to many of my peers discuss their volunteering experience, I wished to intern, as well. I could see a passion in their eyes and I wanted that, too. But where was I going to start? Fortunately, I had an idea about what I wanted to do.

First, I wanted to work with children. Children are amazing. They are imagination unhindered. They are bottled potential. The ‘abnormal’ side of child psychology is just as fascinating. In high school, I had volunteered on a horse therapy ranch, working with children who had ASD, cerebral palsy, and Down syndrome. For my internship, I wanted to work in a similar setting.

I found a place at the Child Development Center of America. My job included interacting with the children while their parents spoke with Dr. Udell about the child’s diagnosis and treatment plan. My responsibilities included measuring the child’s height and weight, conducting ATEC scores when needed, and keeping them engaged for the hour. Dr. Udell used my observations to gauge their progress.

I came to realize that I had knack for connecting with children on the autism spectrum. I began to understand how they interact in, and with, the world. I saw stimming – not as an unhindered, reflexive process – but a means of communication. I saw double swirls and single palmar creases as signs of genetic links to that patient’s condition. I also learned what it meant to have a child with special needs.

Whether your child is neurotypical or not, parenting is a monumental undertaking. It is a full-time job filled with changing diapers, answering hundreds of questions, and chasing after them as they grow up right before your eyes. But what if toilet training takes longer than necessary? What happens when the ‘whys?’ never come? Learning that your child has autism is life changing.

I watched Dr. Udell guide many parents through understanding autism and innovative treatment options. He truly cared about every patient that came through his doorway. He treated each condition on an individual basis. His first question is not, “What helped all the other children?” Rather, he asks, “What seems to be ailing this child?” It opened my eyes to the true nature of psychotherapy and medical treatment. Considering each patient individually may be more time consuming, but it offers the best results.

I am truly thankful for the time I spent with Dr. Udell. I met so many amazing children and their families. I learned so much about the future of autism diagnosis and treatment, and how I can personally make a difference. I look to the future full of hope and inspiration.

Working at the Child Development Center has solidified my passion for working with children, especially those whose diagnoses lie ‘on the spectrum’. I can proudly move forward in my career, knowing that I gained such a wealth of knowledge and support. This experience will enable me to become a top-notch mental healthcare professional for all of my present and future clients.

Many thanks to you, Gabi.
Your intelligence, optimistic personality and inquisitive nature has helped our practice, as well!

I Watched Vaxxed

Monday, October 3rd, 2016

I am not against childhood vaccinations.

I have expressed that opinion in more than a few blogposts. Nonetheless, it appears that more information is needed, and controversies must be addressed, before the gods of modern medicine can simply dismiss the thousands of parents who feel that their child developed autism shortly after one of the childhood inoculations.

genrescue2016

(L-R) Jenny, Jacqueline&Chris Laurita (housewives of NJ), Nico&Davida LaHood, Del Bigtree, Dawn&Ryan Neufeld, Jodi Gomes

This week, at the Autism Summit, Jenny McCarthy expressed that same opinion in her opening video, and throughout the panel discussion. Frankly, I would not have even written this story if there wasn’t a controversy when an Express-News reporter was prevented from attending the conference. He wrote, “The summit is being put on by Generation Rescue, a non-profit led by Jenny McCarthy, an anti-vaccine activist.”

One of the panelists was San Antonio area District Attorney, Nico LaHood. “In a promotional video filmed in his office, LaHood said “vaccines can and do cause autism,” and has made clear he doesn’t accept scientific evidence as proof to the contrary.” Another celebrity was Del Bigtree, the producer of Vaxxed.

So, I paid my four bucks, and watched the movie. Del Bigtree presents a compelling story surrounding the information supplied by CDC whistleblower, William Thompson, who claims that data that would have implicated vaccinations as a cause of autism was altered, so that the MMR would appear safe.

There is a fair amount of anecdotal and perhaps, overly dramatic presentations of individual case histories, which will turn off the ‘real’ scientists. Mr. Bigtree describes that as the conundrum as we, “…study the disconnect between science and parents.”

Dr. Doreen Granpeesheh, founder of CARD, appears as a credible expert. A nobel prize winner weighs in, adding validity to the story. After reviewing the data, a traditional pediatrician and family practitioner seem truly amazed – and changed their opinion about the safety studies. Cool, calm, and well-spoken, Wakefield looks to be anything but a raving zealot. His conclusion is that if the MMR were separated, that would be best solution and the issue of ‘herd immunity’ would not be breached.

I’m not against childhood vaccinations.
Hillary has declared, “The sky is blue and vaccinations work.” She doesn’t know, for sure, if they are safe for all, however. Why deliver an increasing number of antigens to an immature immune system? Why do we have a vaccine compensation fund? Why does the package insert say ‘seizures‘?

If such a movie only adds fuel to the fire, why not just refute the questions that are raised with a prospective, randomized, double blind study, considered to be the gold standard for proving efficacy and safety? Rather, people who even view the film are marginalized and considered kooky, conspiratorist, poorly informed, and ignorant.

The movie is considered to be the problem. Andrew Wakefield is the problem. Leo Kanner, a Freudian from the first half of the last century, assigned the diagnosis to the realm of psychiatry. Bruno Bettleheim, a media darling at the time, popularized the ‘refrigerator mom’ theory that persisted for another 30 years. We are still arguing if there even IS an epidemic. There is plenty of blame to go around regarding our confusion about this mysterious illness.

I’m old enough to have experienced neighbors, relatives and patients who have suffered serious consequences from childhood diseases, such as polio, measles, and congenital rubella. Furthermore, I am aware of the mountain of ‘scientific evidence’ that documents a lack of association to Autism Spectrum Disorder. In my own practice, the majority of parents do not feel that vaccines caused their child’s autism, and there are many children with ASD who never received any inoculation.

However, great concern is raised when there are stories, such as the mismanagement of vaccines in public clinics, and issues with government oversight connected to Big Pharma (documented in this movie).

This is one of the most polarizing issues that impedes real progress in our understanding of the epidemic of childhood autism. In the present circumstance, perhaps it was the fault of the conference organizers, not allowing a possibly negative story to emerge. This highlights the need for both sides to step back and listen to each other in order to uncover the truth.

Finally, I want to document that, I’m not against childhood vaccinations.

Categories Archives Links Contact Us

Brian D. Udell MD
6974 Griffin Road
Davie
FL 33314
Office phone – 954-873-8413
Fax – 954-792-2424

Email bdumd@childdev.org
Copyright © TheAutismDoctor.com 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
All Rights Reserved